House Democrats target Hispanic voters in battlegrounds with new barrage of ads

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) on Wednesday announced a seven-figure ad campaign targeting Hispanic voters in battleground districts throughout the country.

The digital, print and radio ads seek to promote mail voting and to support candidates in tough races.

“We are not taking anything or anyone for granted and our latest investment in digital, print, and radio advertising will reach voters where they get their news,” said DCCC Chairwoman Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosRepublican fears grow over rising Democratic tide Biden, Democrats see late opportunity in Texas The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden asks if public can trust vaccine from Trump ahead of Election Day | Oklahoma health officials raised red flags before Trump rally MORE (D-Ill.) in a statement.

“These investments are only possible because of the early commitment we made to research in critical Latino communities, and build on our on-the-ground work to engage and mobilize Latino voters across the House battlefield,” added Bustos.

The digital ads will run on platforms include Facebook, Instagram, Pandora, Snapchat and YouTube.

They will target voters in five districts in California; two each in Arizona, Nevada and New York; one each in Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Georgia, New Jersey, Utah and Florida; and eight districts in Texas.

Similarly, radio ads will target nine Texas districts, three in California, two in New York and one each in New Mexico and New Jersey.

Print ads will focus more heavily on California. They will be aimed at voters in six of the state’s districts, as well as in four Texas districts and one each in Florida and New York.

The distribution of ads reflects the DCCC’s battleground map. It is defending substantial gains made in 2018 in California, and hoping to replicate that election this year in Texas.

The latest ad barrage follows an independent expenditure TV campaign — ads that weren’t coordinated with individual campaigns and don’t count against campaign spending — released to prop up candidates in California, New Mexico, Florida and Texas.

The content of the ads reflects wildly different realities on the ground across the country.

The video, radio and generic Spanish-language print ads relay a message generally supporting Democratic House candidates and instructions on how to vote by mail.

Early voting has traditionally been favored by Hispanic voters, but they have been slow to adopt mail voting in previous elections.

Initial data seems to show Hispanic voter participation could build on its 2018 surge, despite the difficulties posed by voting during the coronavirus pandemic.

Democrats are pushing two websites, IWillVote.com and VoyAVotar.com, hoping to turn voter interest into effective voter participation.

But the latest ads follow the independent expenditure campaign targeting individual races, such as the one in Florida’s 26th congressional district, where Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-PowellDebbie Mucarsel-PowellDisinformation, QAnon efforts targeting Latino voters ramp up ahead of presidential election Florida Democrat asks FBI to investigate anti-Semitic, racist disinformation Hispanic Caucus members embark on ‘virtual bus tour’ with Biden campaign MORE (D) is fighting off a challenge from Miami-Dade

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House Democrats seek to block funds for ‘defeat despair’ Covid ads

House Democrats overseeing the Trump administration’s coronavirus response will introduce a largely symbolic bill intended to limit the administration’s ability to spend federal funds on certain coronavirus-related advertisements before the election, according to a draft shared first with POLITICO.

The Defeat Pandemic Propaganda Act of 2020 is authored by Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-Ill.), joined by Reps. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y), Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) and Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.). The Democrats’ bill would bar HHS from using taxpayer funds on an ad campaign to “positively influence public perception regarding the Covid–19 pandemic,” specifically distort any facts or encourage risky behaviors amid the outbreak.

“[F]ederally-funded advertisements meant to cast the situation in a positive light or suggest there is no longer a need to take public health precautions would be wholly unethical, especially in the weeks before a presidential election,” Krishnamoorthi said in a statement. A spokesperson for Krishnamoorthi acknowledged the difficulty of moving such legislation forward in a split Congress weeks before the election.

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Obama Says White House Trying ‘To Keep People From Voting’ in New Biden Campaign Ads

Barack Obama has claimed that the White House is “working to keep people from voting,” in one of two new adverts for the Joe Biden presidential campaign that encourage Black people to exercise their power at the ballot box.

The videos, the other featuring vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris, will be featured on popular Black entertainment news sites The Shade Room and The Young, Black, and Fabulous. They ask Black voters to make a plan of where and when to vote.

“Hey, roommates, Barack Obama here. Yes, coming to you from The Shade Room. As you know the election is coming up and I’ve got just one word for you: vote,” the former president says.

“Actually, I’ve got two: vote early. Right now, from the White House on down, folks are working to keep people from voting, especially communities of color.”

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Obama moves on to say that this is “because there is a lot at stake in this election,” mentioning the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, racial justice and “our democracy itself.” He encourages those watching to make a plan to vote early and to tell friends and family to do the same.

The video with vice presidential nominee Harris also starts out with her introducing herself. She then says: “We are coming down to the wire in this election and we know it’s all on the line. Everything from women’s health to our jobs, from black businesses to the quality of our schools and our communities.”

“To make progress in all the ways that matter to us and the ones we love,” Harris says, “we must vote, and we must vote early.”

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She carries on to say that this year, it is “easier and more convenient to make your voice heard on your schedule,” encouraging those who are voting in person to pick a day to go to the polls.

If they are voting by mail, she asks you to get your ballot as soon as possible, either by mailing it in or handing it in person. Harris, like Obama, tells viewers to encourage their friends and family to make a plan to vote as well.

The Shade Room, an Instagram-focused platform founded by Angelica Nwandu in 2014, counts more than 20 million followers on the social media platform.

Meanwhile, the Young, Black and Fabulous website, focused on Black celebrity gossip, was started in 2005 by Natasha Eubanks.

Both platforms have also pivoted to covering racial justice and injustice issues as well as the upcoming election.

A Washington Post-Ipsos poll from June showed that 92 percent of Black registered voters supported Biden over President Donald Trump.

A more recent survey conducted by the Wall Street Journal/NBC News between September 13 -16 found Biden leading Trump among Black voters by 90 percent to 5 percent.

Barack Obama
Former President Barack Obama gives the eulogy at the funeral service for the late Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) at Ebenezer Baptist Church on July 30,
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Ex-White House aide launches ads aimed at getting mothers to vote for Trump

The ad begins with a mother putting her child to bed and watching footage of riots on her cellphone before falling asleep herself and dreaming that Biden and a Democratic Congress have made massive cuts to police funding. Over footage of a protester smashing the window of a minivan with the mother and her child inside, a narrator warns: “They’ll defund police. They’ll disarm you. Don’t let this nightmare come true.”

The effort comes as Trump has seized on a law-and-order message to try to win back the suburban white women who abandoned Republicans in 2018. With national and several battleground state polls showing Trump trailing or tied with Biden, the president in recent weeks has sought to turn public safety into a top campaign issue as some protests against police brutality and racism have turned violent.

“Moms for Safe Neighborhoods came together because a group of concerned mothers saw Joe Biden, Kamala Harris and Democrats calling for diverting money from the police and failing to condemn the violence as it entered neighborhoods across the country,” said Anderson, a mother of two. “They banded together to get their message out to moms everywhere, but also because they understand how critical suburban women are to President Trump’s re-election.”

The group’s “grassroots leadership board” has some heavy hitters of female Republicans, including Penny Nance, CEO and president of Concerned Women for America; Jenny Beth Martin, co-founder of Tea Party Patriots; GOP lawyer Cleta Mitchell; and former Rep. Nan Hayworth (R-N.Y.). Three notable politicians’ wives are also on the board: Debbie Meadows, who’s married to White House chief of staff Mark Meadows; Kristen Short, the wife of Marc Short, Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff; and Susan Allen, who’s married to former Virginia Gov. George Allen.

Anderson, executive director of Heritage Action for America, is doing this in her personal time. She previously worked in the Trump White House as associate director for intergovernmental affairs and strategic initiatives at the Office of Management and Budget.

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NRCC cancels $2 million in Houston-area ads

WASHINGTON – The National Republican Congressional Committee has canceled about $2 million worth of advertising it had reserved for campaigning in the Houston television market, according to several Democratic and Republican sources tracking Houston media advertising who were not authorized to discuss the issue on the record.

The Houston region is home to several contested congressional elections, including the 7th Congressional District, which is represented by U.S. Rep. Lizzie Pannill Fletcher, a Democrat. Fletcher unseated Republican John Culberson in 2018, and she is one of two Democratic incumbents who Republicans have been targeting in Texas this year.

The $2 million was intended to cover advertising in the last two weeks of the election, according to the sources.

One source, a national Republican operative, said the money has been moved to the San Antonio and Dallas-Fort Worth media markets. The San Antonio market includes parts of Congressional District 23, where Republicans are trying to hold on to a seat held by retiring U.S. Rep. Will Hurd, R-Helotes. The Dallas-Fort Worth market includes multiple districts that Democrats are trying to flip, and one district held by U.S. Rep. Colin Allred, D-Dallas, that Republicans are targeting.

The NRCC is the House GOP campaign arm. All Republican members of the House are members of the group, and most members raise money to support the ad campaigns for competitive races around the country.

Historically, the constellation of House Republican groups — the NRCC and their aligned super PACs — tend to move ad buys back and forth between media markets later into the campaign as compared to their Democratic counterparts. At the same time, these kinds of moves cost money. Television rates tend to escalate as the campaign closes in on Election Day.

This year, Texas is home to an unusually large number of congressional battlegrounds. Democrats are targeting 10 seats held by Republicans this year. Republicans are working to flip two, the seats held by Allred and Fletcher.

There is other national GOP money coming to the region. A Republican leadership aligned group, the Congressional Leadership Fund, is expected to spend about $6.25 million in Houston between media advertising and a field operation. The group’s television ad campaign is set to begin on Sept. 23.

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