Adding GFCI Outlets

The information in this article applies to:

QUESTION

I would like to add a 110V GFCI outlets to rooms other than bathrooms. How can I do this?  

ANSWER

To accommodate code requirements in the United States, Chief Architect will add 110V GFCI, or ground fault circuit interrupter outlets in rooms that have the Bathroom Room Type specified. It will not, however, add this outlet type to other rooms. If you would like to use GFCI outlets in other rooms, you can place them manually from the library, or you can use the Replace From Library edit tool to replace existing outlets with GFCI’s.

To manually place outlets from the library

  1. Select View> Library Browser  if the Library Browser isn’t open, and browse to Chief Architect Core Catalogs> Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing> Electrical> Outlets> Surface Mounted> 110V to find an outlet type that suits your needs and select it.

    Browsing to the Outlets folder in the Library Browser
  2. Select the GFCI outlet in the library, and now when you move your cursor, the Electrical icon will follow your cursor.
  3. Click in your plan where you would like to place GFCI outlets.

    GFCI outlet placed onto a wall

To replace existing outlets

You can use the Replace From Library tool to replace objects in a plan with different items from the Library Browser.

  1. Using the Select Objects  tool, click on an outlet that you’d like to replace.  
  2. With the outlet selected, click the Replace From Library  edit button.  
  3. In the Replace From Library dialog that displays:

    Replace From Library dialog

    • Choose the desired Replacement Option.
    • Click the Library button under the Replace with section, and in the Select Library Object dialog, browse the library for the outlet type you would like to use, select it, then click OK.
    • Click OK to replace the chosen outlets with the outlet selected from the library. 

Another way to add GFCI outlets to a room is to temporarily specify the room as a bathroom, use the Auto Place Outlets tool to place outlets in the room, then restore the correct room type.

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Adding ornamental plants to your front garden can help you be happier



a vase of flowers sitting on top of a wooden table: MailOnline logo


© Provided by Daily Mail
MailOnline logo

Growing just a few ornamental plants — such as daffodils or petunias — in a bare front garden can make people feel happier and less stressed, a study found.

Experts led from the Royal Horticultural Society planted blooms including azaleas, clematis and lavender in yards in low-income areas of Salford, Greater Manchester.

They then monitored the stress levels of the residents participating in the study — and explored how the additions to their gardens made them feel.



a vase of flowers sitting on top of a wooden table: Growing just a few ornamental plants ¿ such as daffodils or petunias, pictured ¿ in a bare front garden can make people feel happier and less stressed, a study found (stock image)


© Provided by Daily Mail
Growing just a few ornamental plants ¿ such as daffodils or petunias, pictured ¿ in a bare front garden can make people feel happier and less stressed, a study found (stock image)

The researchers recruited 42 residents — involving a total of 38 gardens — for the study, although some received their plants only after a year as so that they could serve as a control group in the meantime.

Residents were each given one tree, one shrub, one climber and enough smaller plants, bulbs and bedding plants to fill two containers.

They were not required to look after the plants, as the containers could ‘self water’ as they had a 22-litre in-built reservoir — the participants were encouraged to take part by gardening their plot, with help from the Royal Horticultural Society advisors.

The team measured each residents’ levels of key stress response hormone cortisol both before and after the plants were added.

They found a higher proportion of healthy daytime cortisol patterns after planting, suggesting that the residents had a better health status.

The research found that only 24 per cent of residents had healthy cortisol patterns before the plants went in, but over the year following the greening of the front gardens, this increased to 53 per cent.

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More than half of the residents in the trial said that their new garden helped them to feel happier, while two-fifths reported that the garden help them to relax and just over a quarter said that it helped them to get closer to nature.



a brick building: Residents were each given one tree, one shrub, one climber and enough smaller plants, bulbs and bedding plants to fill two containers (middle and left) to add to their bare gardens (right)


© Provided by Daily Mail
Residents were each given one tree, one shrub, one climber and enough smaller plants, bulbs and bedding plants to fill two containers (middle and left) to add to their bare gardens (right)

In-depth interviews concluded that the garden motivated people to do more gardening and renovate other areas of their property.

Residents also reported feeling the garden relaxing, adding that it gave them a sense of pride in their home, while all of them noted that the plants made them feel more cheerful and lifted their spirits when they looked at them.

‘We can now further evidence the vital need to incorporate plants into our front gardens and domestic spaces,’ said paper author and Royal Horticultural Society well-being fellow Lauriane Suyin Chalmin-Pui.

‘This will require

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Three Republican senators test positive for COVID-19, adding to uncertainty surrounding Supreme Court pick

The coronavirus outbreak gripping the White House spread to Capitol Hill on Friday morning, raising the prospect that the virus could disrupt Republicans’ plans to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court before the November election.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Judge Amy Coney Barrett spoke after being nominated to the US Supreme Court by President Trump in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Several people who were in attendance, including the president, have since tested positive for COVID-19, imperiling Barrett's confirmation process.


© OLIVIER DOULIERY
Judge Amy Coney Barrett spoke after being nominated to the US Supreme Court by President Trump in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Several people who were in attendance, including the president, have since tested positive for COVID-19, imperiling Barrett’s confirmation process.

Two Republican members of the Senate Judiciary committee — Mike Lee of Utah, and Thom Tillis of North Carolina – revealed Friday that they have tested positive for the potentially deadly disease.

Their positive diagnoses raised concerns that the virus had spread at a Saturday Rose Garden ceremony, at which Trump announced he was nominating Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

On Saturday morning, Republican Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin said he has tested positive for COVID-19. His office said he is not experiencing symptoms.

The senators are among six people who attended the event, which featured few masks and little social distancing, who have since tested positive for the virus.

Trump, the first lady, and top Trump aide Hope Hicks all attended the event and subsequently tested positive, showing symptoms in the expected five- to seven-day window following the event. Also Friday, the president of the University of Notre Dame, the Rev. John Jenkins, announced he, too, had tested positive for COVID-19. Jenkins attended the Saturday Rose Garden ceremony.

Earlier in the week, Jenkins sent a letter to university students and staff apologizing for not wearing a mask during Saturday’s Rose Garden ceremony for Barrett, who is a Notre Dame graduate and law professor.

Video of the event also shows Lee unmasked and hugging other attendees.

Both Lee and Tillis said they would isolate for 10 days. Lee vowed in a statement that he would “be back to work in time to join my Judiciary Committee colleagues in advancing the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett.”

While the Centers for Disease Control recommend those who test positive should isolate for at least 10 days after their symptoms appear, the agency said doctors may recommend longer isolation periods depending on the severity of the disease.

Guidelines issued by the CDC dictate that Barrett should quarantine for 14 days, because she met with Lee in person (and without masks) a few days ago.

Barrett was diagnosed with the virus over the summer but has since recovered, The Washington Post reported Friday — information that had not previously been made public. The science on immunity following recovery is unsettled. Though public health experts generally believe recovery from COVID-19 confers some immunity and the World Health Organization has said repeated infections are not common, researchers in Hong Kong recently reported evidence that a second infection is possible.

Since receiving the Supreme Court nomination, Barrett is being tested for the virus daily and had

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Adding Color to Your Kitchen

The past few decades were dedicated to very neutral colors in the kitchen. It seems every kitchen had neutral appliances, cabinets and wall coverings. Today, people are being more expressive in the kitchen and that’s great news! The kitchen is where a lot of the daily activity takes place in the home, so make the most of this space.

Here are some places to use color in your kitchen:

* Paint & Wall Coverings: There are a variety of paint colors to choose from, so take your time making a decision. It will be the basis of making other choices for your kitchen. Wallpapers and borders are being use more frequently these days as well.

* Faucets: They’re not just chrome anymore. They come in a wide variety of solid colors and metallic options. It’s amazing what style just a faucet can add to your décor.

* Appliances: Thank goodness, the avocado green appliances of the 70s are gone, but then we moved onto the blah whites. Today, you have more choice, but before you go totally bold, realize that an investment into an appliance is something you’ll need to be happy with for many years to come.

* Cabinets: You can paint over old cabinet colors or install completely new ones. If you install new ones, really take some time with your decision. The expense of totally new cabinetry is not something to be taken lightly.

* Tiling: Look for unique expressions for your floor, backsplash and even your countertops. Tile is fairly easy to install and even easier to maintain.

If you’re not up for a big remodeling, you can still add color easily and little expense. In fact, if you’re working in a generally neutral color-scheme elsewhere in the kitchen, you can change your colors to suit your mood year-round!:

* Table cloths or place mats: Create a whole new color scheme for your kitchen with highly-decorative table cloths or mats.

* Window coverings: Forget bland Venetian blinds. Add some color with colorful fabrics.

* Use flowers, candles and other decorative elements to add color.

* Small appliances: Even the coffee maker and mixer can come in some great color choices. Pick the right one for you.

* Tableware: Dishes come in all kinds of colors and patterns. Choose some that suit your style. If you have neutral colored plates, place colorful charger plates beneath them to add some excitement.

Adding color to your kitchen can be as simple or as complicated as you’d like to make it. For your more involved projects, be sure to plan everything out, so it becomes the dream kitchen you hoped for.…

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