Interior Ministry to involve aviation to respond to illegal actions during Ukraine’s local elections

Interior Ministry to involve aviation to respond to illegal actions during Ukraine's local elections

The involvement of aviation units of the Interior Ministry’s system is provided for a prompt response to changes in the situation during the local elections in Ukraine.

“Based on the calculations, almost 140,000 law enforcement officers will be involved to ensure public security during the local elections. It is planned to involve the aviation units of the Interior Ministry’s system for prompt response to changes in the situation,” First Deputy Interior Minister Serhiy Yarovy said at the meeting.

He said that, given the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic amid which the electoral process is holding, the personnel are provided with protective equipment.

“We will involve reserve groups of law enforcement officers from the central office of the National Police, university cadets and police officers from regional departments,” Yarovy said.

According to Deputy Minister Serhiy Honcharov, operational reserves have been created in the regions to respond to challenges and threats that may arise during the elections.

“In order to increase the efficiency of the formation of reserves and direct response, it is planned to involve our aviation within the election campaign. We plan to involve all the available forces and means of aviation of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, namely, aircraft and helicopters. The presence of helicopters will allow respond to illegal activities in the most remote points where there is no landing strips,” Honcharov said.

Head of the State Emergency Service Mykola Chechotkin said that in order to ensure an adequate level of fire safety and prevent emergencies during the preparation and conduct of local elections, the specialists of the service in the country are inspecting the facilities where the polling stations will be located.

Local elections in Ukraine are scheduled for October 25.

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Gulf Between White House’s Words, Trump’s Actions on Masks | Health News

By DARLENE SUPERVILLE and AAMER MADHANI, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House officials insist that President Donald Trump strongly supports face masks to prevent the spread of coronavirus and always has. But the president’s own words and actions tell a very different — and sometimes puzzling — story.

That’s created a gulf between Trump and public health officials that keeps widening six months after the virus took root in the U.S., with the president undercutting medical experts who say consistent face covering is one of the best tools to fight the pandemic.

Trump initially dismissed mask wearing for himself, then allowed himself to be seen wearing one while visiting a military hospital. He has called it “patriotic” to wear a mask but seldom passes up an opportunity to mock Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden for his routine mask wearing.

On Wednesday, after the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told Congress that his mask might even be a better guarantee than a vaccine against the virus, Trump publicly undercut Dr. Robert Redfield.

“As far as the mask is concerned, he made a mistake,” said Trump.

Dr. Tom Inglesby, director of the Center for Health Security at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, said he’s “bewildered” by Trump’s ambiguity about masks. He said widespread use would also help restore economic vitality faster, a prime Trump goal.

“I don’t think that there’s any controversy about masks anywhere in the world,” Inglesby said. “Why we continue to have this debate about it is a mystery.”

Lawrence Gostin, a public health expert at Georgetown University’s law school, said Trump’s vacillation between portraying masks as an infringement on personal rights and touting them as crucial to stemming the virus has left Americans “absolutely dazed and confused.”

“One could forgive the American public for not trusting anyone,” Gostin said.

But Gostin also faulted Redfield for asserting that masks are more important than an eventual vaccine, at least until one is approved. Suggesting that being vaccinated is less important as long as people are wearing masks has further clouded the public message, Gostin said.

Public health experts largely agree that COVID-19, the disease the virus causes, will be brought under control through a combination of social distancing, mask wearing and a vaccine.

“One of those three is not enough, you need all three,” Gostin said. “It’s such a simple message. It’s just befuddling that the White House doesn’t consistently state that message.”

Trump has very seldom worn a mask for the world to see, though he is regularly tested for COVID-19 and says he does wear one when he can’t practice social distancing. At one point, he suggested that the reason some people wear masks is to make a political statement against him.

The CDC recommended in April that people wear cloth face coverings in public when it’s difficult to be socially distant. But Trump immediately undercut the guidance, declaring he wouldn’t follow it and suggesting it would be unseemly to

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Gulf between White House’s words, Trump’s actions on masks

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House officials insist that President Donald Trump strongly supports face masks to prevent the spread of coronavirus and always has. But the president’s own words and actions tell a very different — and sometimes puzzling — story.

That’s created a gulf between Trump and public health officials that keeps widening six months after the virus took root in the U.S., with the president undercutting medical experts who say consistent face covering is one of the best tools to fight the pandemic.

Trump initially dismissed mask wearing for himself, then allowed himself to be seen wearing one while visiting a military hospital. He has called it “patriotic” to wear a mask but seldom passes up an opportunity to mock Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden for his routine mask wearing.

On Wednesday, after the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told Congress that his mask might even be a better guarantee than a vaccine against the virus, Trump publicly undercut Dr. Robert Redfield.

“As far as the mask is concerned, he made a mistake,” said Trump.

Dr. Tom Inglesby, director of the Center for Health Security at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, said he’s “bewildered” by Trump’s ambiguity about masks. He said widespread use would also help restore economic vitality faster, a prime Trump goal.

“I don’t think that there’s any controversy about masks anywhere in the world,” Inglesby said. “Why we continue to have this debate about it is a mystery.”

Lawrence Gostin, a public health expert at Georgetown University’s law school, said Trump’s vacillation between portraying masks as an infringement on personal rights and touting them as crucial to stemming the virus has left Americans “absolutely dazed and confused.”

“One could forgive the American public for not trusting anyone,” Gostin said.

But Gostin also faulted Redfield for asserting that masks are more important than an eventual vaccine, at least until one is approved. Suggesting that being vaccinated is less important as long as people are wearing masks has further clouded the public message, Gostin said.

Public health experts largely agree that COVID-19, the disease the virus causes, will be brought under control through a combination of social distancing, mask wearing and a vaccine.

“One of those three is not enough, you need all three,” Gostin said. “It’s such a simple message. It’s just befuddling that the White House doesn’t consistently state that message.”

Trump has very seldom worn a mask for the world to see, though he is regularly tested for COVID-19 and says he does wear one when he can’t practice social distancing. At one point, he suggested that the reason some people wear masks is to make a political statement against him.

The CDC recommended in April that people wear cloth face coverings in public when it’s difficult to be socially distant. But Trump immediately undercut the guidance, declaring he wouldn’t follow it and suggesting it would be unseemly to be masked in a meeting with a head

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White House looks at more executive actions as coronavirus-relief talks appear finished

White House officials have discussed trying to unilaterally provide support for the flagging airline industry while also bolstering unemployment benefits, according to two people aware of the deliberations who spoke on the condition of anonymity to share internal policy discussions. The White House has also discussed moving without Congress to direct more money for school vouchers and changing President Trump’s recent payroll tax changes to make it more effective.

In August, Trump signed four executive actions meant to provide more unemployment aid, eviction protections, student loan relief and to defer payroll tax payments. The moves have had mixed success and were meant to address political talks that had faltered on Capitol Hill.

The bipartisan urgency that propelled Congress to act with near-unanimity in March and April to approve an unprecedented $3 trillion in relief has evaporated. In its place is bitter partisan bickering, with each side accusing the other of playing politics and acting in bad faith.

“Democrats just point fingers, call names and keep blocking American families from getting any more help before the November election,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Wednesday on the Senate floor.

The Senate GOP economic relief bill would provide more money for small businesses, $300 weekly unemployment benefits and include a number of other priorities such as lawsuit protections for businesses. It would not include more money for things such as stimulus checks or state aid. The bill needs 60 votes to advance in Senate, and it is expected to fall short in a procedural vote set for Thursday.

McConnell has been under pressure from a handful of vulnerable GOP incumbents who wanted to vote on a coronavirus-relief measure before going back to their states for the final campaign push. The new bill, even if it doesn’t become law, could aid in those efforts, some Republicans believe.

“I think the opportunity to signal their support for a targeted, responsible and responsive package this week is going to be essential,” said Sen. Todd C. Young (R-Ind.), chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee.

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) questioned McConnell’s motives in putting forward a bill that can’t pass. “Is it because they really don’t want a bill, but a political issue — one that will ultimately backfire on them, I believe?” Schumer said.

Democratic leaders and top White House officials met in July and parts of August to try to reach an agreement on a new economic-relief package, concerned about the impact of expiring unemployment benefits, small business aid and eviction protections. But those negotiations faltered as both sides dug in, and Democrats and Republicans have only drifted further apart since then.

Asked whether a deal was possible on Wednesday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said he was not sure.

“I don’t know, we’ll see,” he told reporters. “I hope there is. It’s important to a lot of people out there.”

The only negotiations happening are on a stand-alone spending bill known as a continuing resolution, or CR, to keep the

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