For 3rd Time, Groups Seek End to Trump Order on House Seats | Political News

By MIKE SCHNEIDER, Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — For the third time in two months, civil rights groups and state and local governments were asking judges to strike down a directive from President Donald Trump that would exclude people living in the U.S. illegally from being counted when deciding how many congressional seats each state gets.

The coalition of civil rights groups and state and local governments called Thursday on federal judges in California to rule that Trump’s order was illegal, claiming it discriminates against people based on race, ethnicity, and national origin. They said Trump’s order goes against 230 years of U.S. history, will cause them to lose political representation and is discouraging people in the country illegally from participating in the 2020 census.

Trump administration attorneys say the challenge to the order is premature and should be dismissed.

The numbers used for deciding how many congressional seats each state gets is a process known as apportionment. It is derived from the once-a-decade head count of every U.S. resident that is set to end at the end of the month. The census also helps determine the distribution of $1.5 trillion in federal funding annually.

After Trump issued the order last July, around a half dozen lawsuits were filed across the U.S., challenging it. Hearings on the order already have been held in Washington and New York, and a panel of three federal judges in New York ruled that it was unlawful. The Trump administration has appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The New York judges didn’t rule on the constitutionality of the memorandum, merely saying it violated federal laws on the census and apportionment. That left open the door for the judges in the other cases to rule on other aspects of the president’s memorandum. Other lawsuits challenging the memorandum have been filed in Maryland and Massachusetts, and a lawsuit filed two years ago in Alabama covers the same ground.

The California case was being heard virtually Thursday before three district judges. They included U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh, who last month in a separate case stopped the Trump administration from finishing the census at the of September, allowing the count to go on for another month through October. A different coalition of civil rights groups and local governments had sued the Trump administration for the extra time, arguing minorities and others in hard-to-count communities would be missed if the counting ended early.

The Trump administration on Wednesday asked the Supreme Court to put Koh’s order on hold.

Although the legal fights over Trump’s order and when the census will end are being fought in separate court cases, opponents challenging the Trump administration say they are intertwined since the census schedule was shortened to accommodate Trump’s order.

Facing disruptions to field operations because of the pandemic, the Census Bureau proposed a new timetable in April that extended the deadline for finishing the count from the end of July to the end of October and pushed the apportionment deadline

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N.J.’s top RB Audric Estime picks Michigan State | 3rd Garden State player to join Spartans’ 2021 class

New Jersey’s top running back Audric Estime is a Michigan State Spartan after committing to Mel Tucker this weekend. A 6-1, 225-pound pound senior at St. Joseph Regional (Montvale, N.J.), Estime has received over 25 offers, and is a big bruising throwback runner with burst. Although in-state Rutgers had built-in recruiting advantages, Estime will take his talents to East Lansing following a summer trek to the school.

“A lot of time went into this decision. I had a lot to think about. Me, my family, my coaches and friends,” Estime told NJ Advance Media Sunday. “After all that, we thought that Michigan State would put me in the best position to fulfill my dreams and goals. And they had the best academic program, too.”

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Estime has long been rumored a Michigan State lean, but when did he actually know he’d pick the school?

“I think I knew a couple days ago, I want to say about Tuesday,” Estime said. “I just woke up and was like, ‘Yeah, I’m ready. I want to be my own man. I’m locked in. I’m going to make it happen.’”

Rutgers was initially branded the team to beat with former head coach Augie Hoffmann now coaching running backs at the school. But Estime’s been on the Spartans’ trajectory since an unofficial visit to East Lansing in July, where he was joined by teammate and fellow four-star Geno VanDeMark.

The players weren’t hosted by coaches (due to the recruiting dead period), but were provided an itinerary which included specific stops they were to make while calling certain coaches at predetermined times to interact virtually. I like to call them Coronavirus age unofficial visits, which circumvent restrictions put in place to keep recruits off campus, but don’t technically break any rules.

“Honestly, that visit my eyes opened up even more,” Estime said. “I said to myself I could see myself playing in this stadium and living in this town. That’s when things started to heat up a little bit.”

But that didn’t make breaking the news to his former head coach any less hard.

“It was super-hard telling (Hoffmann) I won’t be teaming up with him again,” Estime said. “I don’t like to break the hearts of people I love. So it was hard for me and it was definitely hard for him.”

Hence, Hoffmann will likely continue to have a relationship with Estime despite his choice. But Rutgers wasn’t the only school Estime had trouble saying no to.

“So was the University of Iowa,” he said.

But, is the door to his recruitment 100 percent closed?

“I’ll still talk to some schools here and there,” he said. “But, as of right now, I’m locked in (with Michigan State) 100 percent,” he said.

And it all began with a visit.

“The week after that when I was talking with my family about it, I would say

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