Bathroom Remodeling 101 – Bob Vila

Bathroom Remodeling

Photo: fotosearch.com

One of the most common home renovations is the addition of a bathroom. Most older houses were built with no more than one bath; in today’s world, there’s almost no such thing as too many baths. In new construction, the rule of thumb is at least one bath for the master bedroom, one bath for every two additional bedrooms, and a half-bath (toilet and sink) near the relaxation area of the house. If you have fewer baths, that may be why you’re reading this article.

You know whether your bathroom facilities are adequate or not. But there are other questions you need to ask yourself as you continue your inspection tour. Is there an electrical outlet in the bathroom and, if so, is it a ground-fault interrupter (GFI) receptacle? This is a safety device that functions as a second fuse and will, in the event of a fault in the ground, shut off power to the outlet and prevent electrical shock. They’re recognizable by their small, rectangular reset buttons located between the plug receptacles.

Is the water pressure adequate? Run the cold water in the tub or shower and then flush the toilet: If the volume of running water diminishes noticeably, the pressure is low. Do you need a second sink? Is there enough ventilation, or does the bathroom fill with steam and remain damp for hours after every shower? Is the tile around the bath or shower tight or are there signs of deterioration at the corners or at the junction between the tile and the tub or shower base? Use the heel of your hand to exert some gentle pressure on the tile walls at the point where they join the tub or shower pan. Is there any give? Springy tile may indicate the wall has gotten damp and deteriorated over the years. The absence of a grout line and the presence of mold are signs that water may be seeping into the wall cavities.

Are the porcelain fixtures in good condition or is there cracking or pitting? Are any of the fixtures of a certain age? Older fixtures, even if they have age lines, can add character. Pedestal sinks, claw-foot tubs, and pull-chain toilets are cherished by some home renovators.

Examine the floors around the toilet: Irregularities in the floor (dips, discoloration, softness) may indicate leakage that has caused decay in the subfloor or even the structure around the toilet. That will need to be repaired. Examine the floors around the perimeter of the room, too. Like kitchens, bathroom floors require wet mopping and if the joint where the floor abuts the walls isn’t watertight, moisture can be wicked by the walls and produce peeling paint or wallpaper and, over the long term, deterioration of the wall itself.

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Bathroom bill – Wikipedia

A bathroom bill is the common name for legislation or a statute that defines access to public toilets by gender (restrooms)—or transgender individual. Bathroom bills affect access to sex-segregated public facilities for an individual based on a determination of their sex as defined in some specific way—such as their sex as assigned at birth, their sex as listed on their birth certificate, or the sex that corresponds to their gender identity.[1] A bathroom bill can either be inclusive or exclusive of transgender individuals, depending on the aforementioned definition of their sex. Unisex public toilets are one option to overcome this controversy.

Critics of bills which exclude transgender individuals from restrooms which conform to their gender identity argue that they do not make public restrooms any safer for cisgender (non-transgender) people, and that they make public restrooms less safe for both transgender people and gender non-conforming cisgender people.[2][3][4] Additionally, critics claim there have been no cases of a transgender person attacking a cisgender person in a public restroom,[2][5] although there has been at least one isolated incident of voyeurism in a fitting room.[6] By comparison, a much larger percentage of transgender people have been verbally, physically, and sexually harassed or attacked by cisgender people in public facilities.[7] For these reasons the controversy over transgender bathroom access has been labeled a moral panic.[8]

Proponents say such legislation is necessary to maintain privacy, protect what they claim to be an innate sense of modesty held by most cisgender people, prevent voyeurism, assault, molestation, and rape,[9] and retain psychological comfort.[10][11]

One bathroom bill, the Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act in North Carolina, was approved as a law in 2016, although portions of the measure were later repealed in 2017 as part of a compromise between the Democratic governor and Republican-controlled Legislature.

Also in 2016, guidance was issued by the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education stating that schools which receive federal money must treat a student’s gender identity as their sex (for example, in regard to bathrooms).[12] However, this policy was revoked in 2017.[12]

Public perception[edit]

Public opinion regarding “transgender bathroom rights” in the United States is mixed, see summary table below.

Date(s) conducted Support laws that require transgender individuals to use bathrooms that correspond to their birth sex Oppose laws that require transgender individuals to use bathrooms that correspond to their birth sex Don’t know / NA Margin of error Sample Conducted by Polling type
May 3, 2017 – May 7, 2017 48% 45% 7% 4% 1,011 adults American adults Gallup Cellphone and landline phones
March 2017 40% 40% ? ? YouGov ?
February 10, 2017 – February, 19, 2017 39% 53% 2.6% 2,031 adults Public Religion Research Institute Live interviews via RDD telephones and cell phones
August 16, 2016 – September 12, 2016, 2016 46% 51% 3% 2.4% 4,538 respondents Pew Research Web and mail
May 4, 2016 – May 8, 2016 50% 40%
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Best Flooring for Bathrooms

In many parts of the home, choosing flooring mainly comes down to appearance. You want your living room, dining room, bedroom, or office flooring to look great; performance, while important, is second. With bathrooms, the playbook changes.

When choosing bathroom flooring, consider how it will perform under stress. And the stress event in this case involves water, lots of it. Water is so prevalent in bathrooms that it is an expectation, not an anomaly. Water is everywhere: on the walls, ceiling, and the floor. Moisture will quickly ruin the wrong flooring. To make matters even more difficult, you eventually have to pull those other factors into the dialogue. If moisture were the only factor, sheet vinyl or ceramic tile would likely win every time. But these additional factors, like durability, appearance, cost, and ease of installation, need to be considered, as well.

Watch Now: 8 Questions to Consider When Buying Flooring

Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Porcelain tile is the best of all worlds for bathroom flooring, as it is waterproof, stylish, and cost-effective. Like stone, porcelain tile can achieve a rich, textured, solid feeling. Like vinyl, it is waterproof and is fairly inexpensive. Like wood flooring, tile looks great.

Should you choose porcelain or ceramic tile and is there a difference between the two? Porcelain is part of the general ceramic tile family with one slight difference: water absorption rate. The Porcelain Tile Certification Agency (PTCA) certifies types of tile as “porcelain” if these tiles have a water absorption rate of 0.5-percent or less. If this is a half bathroom or powder room, there is less of a need to purchase porcelain tiles because there are no bathing facilities.

Because there are so many different types of ceramic tiles, you can create the exact floor you want. You can even find ceramic tile that looks like wood or stone.

Individual tile comes in a wide variety of size and shapes, from square and rectangular to octagonal and hexagonal. Smaller mosaic tiles are pre-mounted on plastic mesh sheets, so you do not have to individually set each tile. With tinted grout, you can be even more creative.

Best of all, tile cleans up well and resists even standing pools of water. Like stone, tile is cold. However, radiant or heated tile can be laid under the tile. Wet tile is slippery. But texturing solves that problem. Smaller tiles are less slippery because more grout is used and the grout acts as a non-skid surface.

Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Many style choices
  • Good resale value
  • Works well with radiant heating
  • Cleans up well

Cons

  • Cold under foot
  • Hard under foot, so it is difficult to stand on for long periods
  • Often sterile-looking
  • Slippery

The Spruce / Margot Cavin

Vinyl Flooring: Sheet, Plank, or Tile

Good-looking and supremely practical, vinyl has been a popular choice for bathroom flooring for decades. Sheet vinyl flooring is your best option if extreme amounts of water are expected, such as in children’s bathrooms or laundry rooms. Because

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Thesaurus:bathroom – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

Sense: a room or enclosed structure used for urination and defecation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]
  • bathroom (US)
  • bog (vulgar slang, UK)
  • bogger (slang, AU)
  • brasco (slang, AU)
  • can (slang, US)
  • carsey (slang, UK)
  • cloaca (obsolete)
  • closet (obsolete)
  • closet of ease (obsolete)
  • cludgie (Scots)
  • cottage (UK gay, slang)
  • crapper (vulgar slang)
  • dike (AU&NZ, slang)
  • dunny (slang, AU&NZ)
  • facilities
  • geography (slang, UK)
  • House of Lords (dated jocular slang, UK)
  • jacks (slang, Irish)
  • jacques (obsolete)
  • jakes (Irish)
  • john (slang, US)
  • karzy (slang, UK)
  • khazi (slang, UK)
  • kocay (obsolete)
  • ladies and gentlemen (rare)
  • latrine
  • lats (UK, slang)
  • lav (UK, slang)
  • lavatory
  • lavabo (jocular slang)
  • lavvy (slang, UK)
  • loo (slang, UK)
  • necessary
  • necessary place (obsolete)
  • neddy (Geordie, obsolete)
  • netty (Geordie)
  • office    [WS] (archaic)
  • place
  • potty (childish)
  • privy (dated)
  • purging place (obsolete)
  • restroom    [WS] (US)
  • shitter (vulgar slang)
  • small room
  • smallest room
  • teahouse (US gay, slang, dated)
  • tearoom (US gay, slang, dated)
  • toilet    [WS]
  • toilet room (dated)
  • throne-room (jocular slang)
  • urination station (slang)
  • usual offices (UK)
  • vault (obsolete)
  • washroom (US, Canada)
  • water closet (UK)
  • WC (UK)
  • withdraught (obsolete)
Hyponyms[edit]
A public bathroom reserved for use by men
A public bathroom reserved for use by women
A permanent outer building used as a bathroom
A secondary bathroom containing only a toilet and sink
A temporary structure used as a bathroom
Other
Hypernyms[edit]
Meronyms[edit]
Holonyms[edit]
Notes[edit]

Although British English also uses the term bathroom to refer euphemistically to a place to urinate and defecate, it uses it much less often than American English in reference to public toilets.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

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Victorian Plumbing | Online Bathroom Specialist

About Victorian Plumbing

Victorian Plumbing is a leading retailer of bathrooms online. From our headquarters based in Liverpool, UK, we sell a huge range of modern and traditional bathroom products on our online store as well as in our showroom. We’ve come a long way from our humble beginnings, and we’re now one of the largest bathroom retailers in the UK.

Over the last few years, bathrooms have become one of the most important rooms to decorate in the home and now, alongside the ideal kitchen, homeowners are looking to increase the value of their home or simply show off a renovated room to their family and friends. We believe by pairing the right suite with stylish fittings and accessories, your perfect bathroom isn’t too far away. That’s why we stock well over 17000 products to help you achieve the look you’ve always wanted, whether you’re dreaming of a complete bathroom suite or just in need of a few accessories, we have the choice and range for you no matter your style and budget. You can shop our easy to use and informative website, find inspiration on our blog and connect with us on social media for updates, ideas and competitions.

If you’re looking for something specific our easy to use search bar at the top of each webpage is the best place to start. We stock 1000’s of bathroom products from leading brands, along with showroom favourites and our best-selling own-brand Victorian Plumbing designed range.

Quality Bathrooms, Without Splashing Out

Online Bathroom Specialist
We’ve built an excellent reputation at Victorian Plumbing by knowing what you, the customer wants. As an online bathroom specialist we know you want bathrooms that are stylish and high quality products, yet real value for money. Our buying team excel in sourcing the best brands and ensuring we get the best designs and styles at the lowest prices.

We truly believe in our ethos of Quality Bathrooms, Without Splashing Out. It’s cheesy – but it represents what we’re all about here at Victorian Plumbing.

It means beautiful designer bathrooms are no longer only for posh hotels and stately homes. With our internet prices and next day delivery option you’ll be able to order your bathroom online today and take delivery tomorrow, ready to plumb in and enjoy.

Renovate Your Bathroom

Renovate Your Bathroom with Victorian Plumbing
Monday morning are hard enough as it is without having to battle with shoddy showers and temperamental taps. Couple these common problems with an awful avocado suite and you’ve got a recipe for a disastrous start to any week. Many of our bathroom products are guaranteed for 5 – 25 years and, in some cases, full lifetime manufacturer guarantees are supplied. This not only shows you just how confident we are in the quality of the items we sell but it gives you complete peace of mind when purchasing them from us.

A new bathroom doesn’t always mean modern and minimal. With our roots in the restoration and sales

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Bathroom Faucets | Sink, Bathtub, Shower at Modern Bathroom

From Antique Brass to Contemporary Faucets & Fixtures

Choose from a wide selection of faucet finishes and styles in widespread, centerset, wall-mounted and single-hole configurations. From antique brass faucets to accompany your traditional bathroom furniture, to contemporary faucets and fixtures to match the modern furniture in your trendy bathroom, you’ll find just what you’re looking for at Modern Bathroom.

When it’s classic style that you’re after in your bathroom fixtures, we have the traditional bathtub and sink faucets that are right up your alley. Our catalog of options includes a variety of traditional-style products, perfect for complementing the overall look and feel of your traditional bathroom. Our traditional faucets include options from brands like TOTO, Danze, Grohe and our own designs; in finishes like brushed nickel, chrome, crystal, oil-rubbed bronze, polished brass, polished nickel, satin black, sterling and tumbled bronze. With their timeless character and craftsmanship, these faucets work beautifully in a wide range of homes.

Because we cater to a range of bathroom styles, we also offer a variety of sleek, stylish contemporary faucets for sinks and tubs. When you’re looking for a bold and modern bathroom look, our contemporary options are the perfect fit. Choose from hundreds of options, created by top brands like Aquatica, Danze, Grohe, Toto or our own Modern Bathroom line. Showcasing modern lines and shapes, our contemporary faucets help you make a strong statement with your bathroom design. Opt for a contemporary faucet when you want to create an edgier, more modern style in your bathroom at home.

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Bathroom Ideas Photo Gallery 2019

Instructions: Click through the buttons below to sort by size and style. Click the photo for a larger view.

Instead of patterned wallpaper, try freehanding a simple pattern for a playful bathroom design.

Photo by: Mix & Match

Flowers don’t have to make a bathroom feel messy. Try this elegant take by using just a few sprigs.

Photo by: 12 Oaks Blog

Instead of tile, next time consider a concrete or stone sink.

Photo by: 4 Men 1 Lady

Have a dark bathroom? Brighten it up with accent pieces like the yellow accessories in this dark navy bathroom.

Photo by: Addicted 2 Decorating

If you’re looking for small bathroom storage ideas, try turning hidden areas into shelf space, like under the sink or above the toilet.

Photo by: Beneath My Heart

If you love the look of wood, but fear the staining effects of hard water, opt for elegant faux wood flooring like linoleum.

Photo by: Centsational Girl

For bathroom cabinet ideas, look no further than this elegant design. Opt for tall cabinets to split up a Jack and Jill sink.

Photo by: Creekline House

Wood panels aren’t just for the floor. Try it on your bathroom walls for a spa like effect.

Photo by: Financial Samurai

When searching for shower tiles, opt for a shade that matches your floors for a look that continues seamlessly.

Photo by: Hello Splendid

This simple black and white bathroom get a small pop of color from its framed photo.

Photo by: Home with Baxter

The olive walls in this bathroom are a unique departure from the majority of soft blue and grey rooms.

Photo by: Houseography

This small bathroom makes the clawfoot tub the star.

Photo by: I Heart Naptime

This symmetrical bathroom will put any stresses at ease.

Photo by: I Heart Naptime

If the space above your vanity doesn’t get enough natural light, move your mirror somewhere else for a more flattering view.

Photo by: Inspired by Charm

Can’t decide on tile? Try this bathroom tile idea—pick one dominate design and one accent option.

Photo by: Lemon Thistle

If your toilet is in a small nook, make it more interesting by adding shelving spaces and indoor plants.

Photo by: Little Green Notebook

You don’t have to break the bank to get marble countertops. Shop for marble alternatives like quartz or granite.

Photo by: Maison De Pax

Instead of one large mirror for the bathroom, try incorporating two. One for a full body view and one for close ups.

Photo by: One Week Bath

Bring some much needed freshness to your bathroom with a small herb garden.

Photo by: Our Fifth House

If you can’t choose between tile, paint, or molding, take a tip from this bathroom that uses it all without clashing.

Photo by: Provident Home Design

Via: Freshome

A small bathroom doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice that big mirror. Let it be the showpiece in your room.

Photo by: Rain on a Tin Roof

Welcome to the shower of

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Bathroom Germs You Really Can Catch

If you’ve seen a household cleanser ad lately, you’ve probably seen a bacteria, mold, or fungus, personified as an ugly little critter with sharp teeth, scaly skin, and a bad attitude. Those ads make it seem as if bathroom germs are mounting a daily, organized invasion of your tub, toilet, and shower. But what are the real bathroom germs lurking behind your sink, what can you catch from them, and how can you combat them?


Bathroom Germs: They’re Everywhere

The bad news is yes, there are probably a lot of germs in your bathroom. In fact, there are a lot of germs on your body.

“There are more germs than body cells on the human body, by a factor of 10,” says Philip M. Tierno, Jr., PhD, director of clinical microbiology and diagnostic immunology at Tisch Hospital, New York University Medical Center. “So 90% of the total number of cells on your body are actually germ cells. We can’t live in a bubble and avoid germs.” But, says Tierno, most germs are perfectly harmless to us.

Not all of them, of course. So what harmful germ beasties might be prowling in your bathroom? There are several types:


  • Gastrointestinal viruses that cause stomach ailments in humans. These include the norovirus, which you may have heard of in connection with cruise ship outbreaks. These viruses aren’t just on cruise ships; they can be exploring your toilet seat as well. Gastrointestinal viruses “are easily transmitted and can remain on a solid surface for as much as a week,” says Tierno.


  • Enteric pathogens
    , which are organisms spread by contaminated foods (and can, of course, be carried in feces). These include things like E. coli, salmonella, shigella, and campylobacter. E. coli O157:H7 is particularly nasty, causing severe diarrhea with bloody stools. “It’s the bacteria that killed four children and caused a lot of illness at Jack-in-the-Box restaurants in California in 1993,” says Donna Duberg, MA, MS, assistant professor of clinical laboratory science at Saint Louis University.

  • Skin and respiratory organisms, such as staphylococcus aureus (“staph”) bacteria, including the antibiotic resistant MRSA strain, and Group A Strep, known as the “flesh-eating” bacteria.

  • Dermatophitic fungi, like athlete’s foot, transmitted by walking barefoot in the bathroom.

  • Other residual fungi, like those indigenous to showers — the “mold and mildew” of bathroom cleanser fame. “They don’t cause infection, but they can exacerbate asthma and allergies,” says Tierno.

But before you evacuate your bathroom and call Hazmat, here’s the good news: if you clean regularly and practice basic hygiene, there’s very little risk from the bathroom germs you’ll find there. “Only about 1%-2% of all germs are pathogenic — meaning they can make us sick,” says Tierno. “There’s a possibility you can catch something, but if you practice good personal, household, and food hygiene, you’re at pretty low risk.”


Continued

Bathroom Germs: Keeping the Bathroom Clean

If you

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How to Add a Bathroom

The number of bathrooms in a home can really make or break the home’s overall functionality for its inhabitants. But before you put your house on the market to look for a new one with that extra bathroom you’ve been dreaming of, you may be able to easily add a bathroom to your existing home — which will not only solve your problem, but will also up your property value. Here’s what you need to consider when adding a bathroom to your home.

Where will it be sited?

The great thing about adding a bathroom to your home is that it doesn’t typically require a lot of space. At bare minimum, you’ll need about a three-foot by six-foot space to add a half bathroom. If you require a shower, it will need to be a bit larger, and for a full tub even bigger (about five-foot by eight-foot). You can always go bigger than that if you have the space, but remember that the bigger the bathroom, the bigger the price tag.

Finding this space may actually be easier than you think and can often be done without even changing the footprint of your home. Carefully look at how your home is constructed and search out any dead space. Some common areas where you might find space that can be converted into a bathroom are under a stairwell, in an over-sized closet, or even in an over-sized bathroom (some of the bathrooms in homes built in the past 10 to 20 years are so large that they can be divided into two average size bathrooms). You can also look to an attached garage that you can bump into from a shared wall, an attic space that can have a dormer added to it, or other rooms in your home that can handle losing a few square feet without causing space issues. If all else fails, you can also steal a few square feet from your yard and put an actual addition on your home with a slab foundation or crawl space below.

Can the pipes and electrical be easily tied into that space?

When adding a bathroom, any plumbing or electrical work will need to be done to the current codes. Sometimes this can result in needing to update entire household systems, and other times it is simpler than that, but it’s important to determine what changes to the plumbing and electric will need to be made before starting your project. If your home is on a septic system, it is crucial that you determine whether the system can withstand the addition of another bathroom or you may have an expensive system upgrade on your hands.

The easiest way to add a bathroom is to tie it into the existing plumbing, so if you can site the bathroom on the opposite side of an existing bathroom wall where the pipes can meet each other, your plumbing costs will be reduced for the new bathroom. This is particularly the case when

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Small Bathroom Colors | Small Bathroom Paint Colors

Small bathrooms are a burden to us all. We could always use more space, but physical limitations prevent many from expanding their current bathroom. A terrific, easy and cheap way to make your bathroom seem larger is with paint.

Painting a stripes on an accent wall isn’t only trendy, but can make your bathroom appear larger.

If you think your bathroom is small, but want that real master feel, be sure to check out our painting tips and small bathroom colors that will make your small bathroom seem larger.

Looking to upgrade your small bathroom paint color? Use ImproveNet to find reliable interior painters near you.

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1. Small Bathroom Paint Colors

The best way to make your bathroom or any room seem larger is to use bright paint colors. Some say that more white makes for a larger appearance, but that debate will go on for years to come.

This entire article is about optical illusion. Light and brightly colored walls are more reflective, making any space feel open and airy. Additionally, light colors help augment the effect of natural light (which we all love). As such, the following small bathroom paint colors will surely make your bathroom feel larger.

Best Paint Color for Small Bathrooms with No Windows

  1. Icy Blue
  2. Cream
  3. Soft Green
  4. White
  5. Pearl Gray
  6. Pink
  7. Yellow
  8. Aqua

Want to give it a try? Use ImproveNet to find interior painters near you.

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Same Tone

Similar hues can made your small bathroom look larger.

2. Keep All Same Tone

As I will get into later, just because light colors are smart small bathroom wall colors, the entire room does not have to be the same color. However, if you really want your small bathroom to feel like the master that you deserve, keep all colors within the same tone.

Light bathroom colors are great, but if you installed dark tile on the floor or in the shower, the light colors will not stand out. The large contrast will clog up the space and showcase how small your bathroom really is. We don’t want that.

Did You Know?

ImproveNet has resources for homeowners at all stages of home design!

  • Looking for ideas & inspiration
  • Planning or researching a project
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Great! You might enjoy our cost guides.

See national and local prices for common home improvement projects.


National Paint a Home Interior Costs

$1,679

Average Cost

$60

Minimum Cost

$4,300

Maximum Cost

Average Range:

$1,130
to
$1,826

National Average Cost $1,679
Minimum Cost $60
Maximum Cost $4,300
Average Range $1,130
to
$1,826

How do we get this data? This info is based on 12,082 cost profiles, as reported by ImproveNet members.


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3. Blend Tile Color & Wall Color

This tip jumps off the previous hack,

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