Sinema Pursued Into Bathroom By Activists, Biden Unimpressed

This past weekend, Arizona voters, activists who helped Krysten Sinema get elected to the Senate, were so frustrated by her lack of accountability that they followed her into a restroom to demand answers.

Joe Biden, at his press conference this morning, was not impressed, calling her experience “part of the process” when you don’t have secret service protection.

There is an answer for Krysten Sinema. Meet with your own voters.

And from my colleague Susie Madrak:

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Kyrsten Sinema’s bathroom protest was a long time coming

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., is unhappy that a group of progressive activists followed her into a bathroom over the weekend. In a statement Monday, she said what the activists did was “wholly inappropriate.”

“Yesterday’s behavior was not legitimate protest,” Sinema wrote. Leaving aside that Sinema doesn’t get to set the terms of how her constituents hold her accountable, you know who would have likely applauded those activists’ tactics? A young Kyrsten Sinema, the one who didn’t mind calling out Democrats who are more interested in obtaining power than in using it to advance their values.

During the last few weeks, a tidal wave of ink has been spilled as we all try to figure out, in brief, what Sinema’s deal is. Why is the first-term senator acting as a roadblock to passing President Joe Biden’s agenda? What’s driving her? Political donors’ priorities? A misreading of the Arizona electorate? Is she lining up a lobbying gig after her term ends? Does she have a raging case of McCain Maverick Syndrome?

But the here’s the biggest question of them all: What sparked Sinema’s transformation from a Green Party activist into a centrist who may derail one of the largest, most progressive bills we’re likely to see during Biden’s presidency?

As you might expect, the attempts to find the answer have ranged in quality and prescriptive usefulness. The best of them so far comes from Mother Jones reporter Tim Murphy, whose recent profile of Sinema charts her rise through the ranks of Arizona politics and explains how few of her former allies recognize her now.

In her youth, Sinema was part of the antiwar movement ahead of the U.S. invasion of Iraq. And at the time, she had no tolerance for Democrats who would support the coming war:

When hawkish and conservative-leaning Connecticut Sen. Joe Lieberman passed through Tucson during his presidential campaign in 2003, Sinema led a caravan of activists to protest outside his event. “He’s a shame to Democrats,” she told a reporter. “I don’t even know why he’s running. He seems to want to get Republicans voting for him—what kind of strategy is that?”

It’s a valid question, one that has grown only more important 18 years later. It’s also apparently the kind of strategy that would wind up appealing to Sinema just a few years later as she shed her activism for what she’d come to describe as “letting go of the bear and picking up the Buddha.” Translation: Don’t pick fights with people you disagree with; instead, be more chill and open-minded toward your opponents in the interest of enlightened peace.

As a result, it’s hard to imagine Sinema’s 2003 condemnation of Lieberman coming from her mouth today. In the years since then, she has moderated her stances and leaned into a fervid attempt to rebuild the interparty comity that Biden so fondly recalls. When she was in the state Legislature, that meant trying to sway Arizonans against a same-sex marriage ban by highlighting its impact on

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Andy Murray fumes over Stefanos Tsitsipas long bathroom break

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Former U.S. Open champion Andy Murray was fuming toward the end of his first-round loss to No. 3 seed Stefanos Tsitsipas on Monday — and well afterwards — over what he viewed as an unethically long bathroom break before the decisive fifth set. Tsitsipas also took a medical timeout after losing the third set to Murray to have the trainers look at a foot injury. 

Immediately after the bathroom break, which clocked in at roughly eight minutes, Tsitsipas broke Murray’s serve and held on for an eventual 2-6, 7-6 (9-7), 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 victory. Murray complained loudly about it to the chair umpire throughout the fifth set and offered an icy handshake at the net following match point. 

Even after cooling down briefly in the locker room, Murray didn’t hesitate to unload on Tsitsipas’ tactics.

“It’s just disappointing because I feel it influenced the outcome of the match,” Murray said. “I’m not saying I necessarily win that match, for sure, but it had influence on what was happening after those breaks. I think he’s a brilliant player. I think he’s great for the game. But I have zero time for that stuff at all, and I lost respect for him.”

Murray, who is 34 years old and attempting to come back after having a major hip surgery in 2019, said he knows his comments could be construed as sour grapes but said he’d have come into the press conference saying the same thing if he’d won. And he’s not the only player to take issue with Tsitsipas’ lengthy trips to the bathroom after sets.

In fact, at the Western & Southern Open in Cincinnati fewer than two weeks ago, Alexander Zverev accused Tsitsipas during their semifinal match of taking his cell phone into the restroom after losing the first set and texting with his coach and father Apostolos, which is not allowed on the ATP Tour. 

Zverev had no proof that Tsitsipas broke any rules, but at the very least, the long restroom breaks can be viewed as an attempt to disrupt rhythm or frustrate an opponent — and Tsitsipas has gained a reputation for abusing that loophole.

Tsitsipas dismissed the Zverev accusations as the product of his imagination — “I have never in my career done that,” he said — and defended his use of the bathroom breaks.

“I think it’s clear that I took my clothes with me when I left the court, and that’s the amount of time it takes for me to change my clothes and come back to the court — takes a little bit of time,” he said. “As far as I know you’re allowed to have two toilet breaks to change clothes in a five

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