Secret Service reportedly had to use Obama’s bathroom after being barred from Ivanka Trump’s

Facebook is evidently now looking to minimize politics on its platform, as CEO Mark Zuckerberg says the company hopes to “turn down the temperature.”

Zuckerberg during an earnings call Wednesday announced Facebook will stop recommending political and civic groups to users, which he described as a “continuation of work we’ve been doing for a while to turn down the temperature and discourage divisive conversations,” Politico reports.

The social media company has long faced criticism over the amount of misinformation and polarization on its platform, with its recommendations being a frequent target of these complaints. Facebook previously said it would be putting these recommendations on pause in the lead-up to the 2020 presidential election, Politico notes. Additionally, Zuckerberg said Wednesday the company plans to take action to reduce the amount of politics in users’ news feeds, Axios reports, but he didn’t offer any further information on that effort.

“There has been a trend across society that a lot of things have become politicized and politics have had a way of creeping into everything,” Zuckerberg said. “A lot of the feedback we see from our community is that people don’t want that in their experience.”

Zuckerberg added that if users do want to discuss politics or join political groups, “they should be able to,” but “we are not serving community well to be recommending that content right now.”

The company by looking to “downplay politics” on the platform was “backing away from arguments it’s long made that political speech is vital to free expression,” Axios wrote. The decision came after various companies have taken steps to either ban political ads or limit them in certain situations, not to mention after numerous platforms suspended former President Donald Trump, leading Axios to conclude, “The social platforms that profited massively on politics and free speech suddenly want a way out — or at least a way to hide until the heat cools.” Brendan Morrow

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Guide to Selecting Bathroom Cabinets

Bathroom cabinets are widely considered to have the most impact in a bathroom redo, but choosing from the mile-long list of options can be overwhelming. You’ll find yourself pondering unassembled versus finished cabinets, stock versus custom, contemporary versus country and maple versus cherry, to name a few.

“Cabinets affect the look and feel of the entire room,” says Meriam Reed, co-owner of a DreamMaker Bath & Kitchen franchise in Naples, Fla. “They pretty much set the tone for your bathroom makeover.” The days of simply picking out a medicine cabinet and being done with it are long over. So, how and where do you start?

“The first step is to understand how you use your space,” advises Lenia Pilkonis, a certified designer with Home Depot in Atlanta. “It’s a very individual thing.” So take a minute to think about how you use the room and use that information to help you decide on the best configuration, materials, style, etc. for your new cabinetry. For instance, if you like long, leisurely soaks in the tub, you may want to incorporate a linen tower with a shelf for a TV into your plans.

Another good place to start is at the local bookstore or newsstand. “Flip through design books and magazines for ideas,” Meriam says. “Find out what you like then narrow down your choices based on what you want to accomplish.” Visiting a designer showroom, particularly an interactive one where you can pull out drawers and peek behind doors, is another excellent strategy when you’re first getting started.

“In reality, it’s more complicated to design a bathroom than it is a kitchen,” says Lenia, “because you’re not only working with a smaller space, but because almost everything you touch has either water, electrical and/or drainage issues.” To that end, you may want to consider hiring an interior designer or kitchen and bath specialist to help guide your makeover.

“Unlike in a kitchen remodel, cabinets aren’t necessarily the most expensive thing involved in a bathroom remodel,” Meriam says. Still, new bathroom vanities and cabinets can cost anywhere from a few hundred dollars well into the thousands. Like with most things, you get what you pay for, but there are some things you can do to help offset the outflow. For instance, this is another place where having a certified bathroom designer can come in handy, because their connections can garner special deals and rates with even the swankiest dealers and showrooms.

Buying unfinished cabinets and installing and finishing them yourself will save you some money, but it can be painstaking and backbreaking work. Shopping online for the best deals can help make your renovation dollar stretch a little further as well. “It’s like buying a car or anything else over the Internet, though,” warns Lenia. “If you can’t touch it and, in this case, inspect the box and door construction of the cabinets, you can’t always be sure what you’re going to get.” In her opinion, the best advice for getting the

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Supreme Court won’t take up case challenging school’s policy allowing a transgender student to use bathroom corresponding with their identity

The petition was considered a long shot because of several complicated threshold issues, including the fact that the policy had been put in place five years ago for one student — referred to as “student A” — who has since graduated from the high school located in Dallas, Oregon. At issue was an individualized plan drawn up specifically for “student A.”

In declining to take up the petition, the justices left in place an appeals court decision earlier this year that held that the school’s policy intended to “avoid discrimination and ensure the safety and well-being of transgender students.”

“A policy that allows transgender students to use school bathroom and locker facilities that match their self-identified gender in the same manner that cisgender students utilize those facilities does not infringe Fourteenth Amendment privacy or parental rights or First Amendment free exercise rights, nor does it create actionable sex harassment under Title IX,” Judge Atsushi Wallace Tashima wrote for the appeals court.

The Supreme Court’s action Monday was taken without comment or noted dissent.

The American Civil Liberties Union cheered the court’s move on Monday, saying the justices’ message was that “transgender youth are not a threat to other students.”

“The decision not to take this case is an important and powerful message to trans and non-binary youth that they deserve to share space with and enjoy the benefits of school alongside their non-transgender peers,” Chase Strangio, the deputy director for trans justice with the ACLU’s LGBT and HIV Project, said in a statement.
Federal appeals court sides with student in Virginia transgender bathroom case

Despite Monday’s order, the issue isn’t likely to go away soon. Other lower courts have addressed a related question brought by lawyers for transgender students concerning whether Title IX or the Constitution requires schools to allow transgender students to have equal access to bathrooms consistent with their gender identity. A case on that issue is expected to reach the court early next year.

The transgender bathroom debate has long been a flashpoint for the court. Supporters of LGBTQ rights fear that the Supreme Court’s newly solidified 6-3 conservative majority could prove to be hostile toward policies in favor of transgender students.

In late August, a federal appeals court handed a win to a transgender former student in a years-long fight over restroom policies, ruling that policies segregating transgender students from their peers are unconstitutional and violate federal law prohibiting sex discrimination in education. That decision relied in part on the Supreme Court’s ruling earlier this year in favor of LGBT workers.

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Bathroom Layout Planner | HGTV

Setting style aside for a moment, your bathroom redesign or install will definitely benefit from the use of a bathroom layout planner. This is one space in the home where you definitely don’t want to wing it—space is at a premium for most bathrooms, and proper planning should allow you to create a space that’s efficient, but also allows for some useful and attractive extras.

Before you begin thinking about a floor plan for your bathroom, you’ll have two primary questions to answer: Who will use the bathroom, and how will they use the space?

If your plan is to use existing plumbing hookups, a large portion of your planning may be done already. But if moving plumbing (while staying up to code) is in the cards, you could be starting with a blank slate.

Speaking of code, be sure to investigate the International Residential Code (IRC) as it applies to bathrooms, in order to make sure you’re complying with regulations as well as taking into account their helpful design recommendations.

One smart investment you can make, particularly if you’re planning to stay in the home for a long time, is to implement universal design. This approach incorporates “user friendly” aspects such as wider doorways, taller toilets and curbless showers.

Lastly, lighting is an extremely important aspect of any bathroom design. There are four types of lighting to pay attention to: task, ambient, accent and decorative. The correct combination of these styles will ensure that you’re planning a bright and functional bathroom space.

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