Photos: Hundreds of supporters gather for Trump’s White House event

Ahead of President Trump’s first in-person event since his COVID-19 diagnosis, large crowds made their way to the White House’s grounds Saturday.

They gathered on the South Lawn, where Trump delivered a speech from the White House’s balcony. Hundreds attended the event.

Earlier today, the president’s supporters, donning “Make America Great Again” hats and blue “We The Free” t-shirts, rallied at The Ellipse, the park south of the White House lawn. Someattendees did not appear to be wearing masks.

The Trump campaign said all attendees would be given a temperature check and that the wearing of masks would be encouraged.

President Donald Trump appears on the balcony during a rally at the White House in Washington on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, during his first public event since being hospitalized for COVID-19.
President Donald Trump appears on the balcony during a rally at the White House in Washington on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, during his first public event since being hospitalized for COVID-19.DOUG MILLS/NYT
President Donald Trump appears on the balcony during a rally at the White House in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, his first public event since being hospitalized for COVID-19.
President Donald Trump appears on the balcony during a rally at the White House in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, his first public event since being hospitalized for COVID-19.Doug Mills/NYT
People attend a rally at the White House in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, as President Donald Trump appears on the balcony during his first public event since being hospitalized for COVID-19.
People attend a rally at the White House in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, as President Donald Trump appears on the balcony during his first public event since being hospitalized for COVID-19. DOUG MILLS/NYT
Supporters listen as President Donald Trump speaks from the Blue Room Balcony of the White House to a crowd of supporters, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington.
Supporters listen as President Donald Trump speaks from the Blue Room Balcony of the White House to a crowd of supporters, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington. Alex Brandon/Associated Press
Supporters of President Donald Trump march in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020. Trump is scheduled to  appear on the balcony of the White House on Saturday afternoon, and address a previously scheduled gathering of conservative activists.
Supporters of President Donald Trump march in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020. Trump is scheduled to appear on the balcony of the White House on Saturday afternoon, and address a previously scheduled gathering of conservative activists. STEFANI REYNOLDS/NYT
Supporters of President Donald Trump hold up ÒBack the BlueÓ signs during a rally outside the White House in Washington, Oct. 10, 2020. Trump, eager to prove he has fully recovered a week after being hospitalized for Covid-19, appeared briefly on Saturday afternoon in front of hundreds of chanting supporters gathered at the White House.
Supporters of President Donald Trump hold up ÒBack the BlueÓ signs during a rally outside the White House in Washington, Oct. 10, 2020. Trump, eager to prove he has fully recovered a week after being hospitalized for Covid-19, appeared briefly on Saturday afternoon in front of hundreds of chanting supporters gathered at the White House. Stefani Reynolds/NYT
Supporters of President Donald Trump rally at The Ellipse, before entering to The White House, where Trump will hold an event on the South lawn on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington.
Supporters of President Donald Trump rally at The Ellipse, before entering to The White House, where Trump will hold an event on the South lawn on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington.Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press
President Donald Trump supporters rally at The Ellipse, before entering to The White House, where President Trump will hold a rally in the South lawn on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington.
President Donald Trump supporters rally at The Ellipse, before entering to The White House, where President Trump will hold a rally in the South lawn on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington.Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press
Supporters of President Donald Trump rally at The Ellipse, before entering to The White House, where Trump will hold an event on the South lawn on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington.
Supporters of President Donald Trump rally at The Ellipse, before entering to The White House, where Trump will hold an event on the South lawn on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington.Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press
Supporters of President Donald Trump receive pizza after a rally at The Ellipse, before entering to the White House, where Trump will hold an event on the South lawn on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington.
Supporters of President Donald Trump receive pizza after a rally at The Ellipse, before entering to the White House, where Trump will hold an event on the South lawn on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington.Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press
Conservative commentator and political activist Candace Owens speaks during a rally at The Ellipse, before entering to the White House, where President Donald Trump will hold an event on the South lawn on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington.
Conservative commentator and political activist Candace Owens speaks during a rally at The Ellipse, before entering to the White House, where President Donald Trump will hold an event on
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Trump’s post-hospital White House appearance takes on campaign rally themes

Oct. 10 (UPI) — President Donald Trump turned his first post-COVID public appearance into a campaign rally on the White House South Lawn Saturday, nine days after was hospitalized for the coronavirus infection.

Thanking supporters for prayers and well wishes for himself and the first lady, within minutes Trump had referred to his Democratic presidential opponent as “Sleepy Joe Biden,” had boasted about the border wall and delivered other material typical of a campaign speech.

“We gotta vote these people into oblivion. Into oblivion. Gotta get rid of ’em. So bad for our country,” the president said.

About 400 people attended the invitation-only event. Trump called the event a peaceful protest for law and order and blamed the “radical Socialist Left” for civil unrest in U.S. cities this summer.

“Where there is evidence of wrongdoing by police, the criminal justice system must investigate and any perpetrators must be held accountable,” Trump said. “But we must never allow mob rule.”

Event organizers of Candace Owens’s BLEXIT Foundation paid for travel and lodging of some attendees and demanded that they wear matching shirts, ABC reported Saturday. Attendees were asked to wear masks, but were packed tightly together, not following social distancing guidelines.

Attendees were also scheduled to attend a pro-law enforcement rally in Washington, D.C.

The speech lasted about 18 minutes, much shorter than Trump’s usual campaign rally remarks, which can last more than an hour.

Trump, with flesh-colored bandages visible on his hands, downplayed his time at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and said he was returning to the campaign trail.

“I feel great,” he said. “We are starting very, very big with our rallies and with our everything,” Trump promised. The president has rallies planned in Florida, Pennsylvania and Iowa next week.

The speech ended with supporters chanting “four more years!” and Trump urging them to “get out and vote — and I love you.”

The president has not been seen in public other than in White House-released videos since his release from the hospital five days ago. The White House declined to say Saturday whether Trump was still potentially contagious from COVID-19 .

The last public event at the White House was the Sept. 26 Rose Garden ceremony to announce Supreme Court Justice candidate Amy Coney Barret’s nomination. Public health officials determined the gathering of more than 200 people was a “super-spreader” event which has been linked to dozens of COVID-19 infections, including those in Trump’s inner circle.

On Saturday, Trump campaign advisor and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie announced he had been released from the hospital following treatment for the coronavirus.

Joe Biden’s campaign said Saturday that he had again tested negative for the virus. Biden’s campaign has been releasing regular updates since Biden appeared on the same Cleveland stage as Trump in a debate on Sept. 29.

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White House COVID-19 aid offer is panned by Pelosi, Senate GOP

WASHINGTON — A new White House coronavirus aid offer got bad reviews from both ends of the political spectrum on Saturday.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., rejected the most generous Trump administration plan to date as “one step forward, two steps back.” The Republicans who control the Senate dismissed it as too expensive and a political loser for conservatives.

Pelosi said she is still hopeful that progress can be made toward a deal but it’s as clear as ever that GOP conservatives don’t want a deal on her terms.

The White House had boosted its offer before Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Pelosi spoke on Friday afternoon. President Donald Trump is eager for an agreement before Election Day, even as his most powerful GOP ally in the Senate said Congress is unlikely to deliver relief by then.

“Covid Relief Negotiations are moving along. Go Big!” Trump said Friday on Twitter.

The new offer totals about $1.8 trillion, aides familiar with it said, with a key state and local fiscal relief component moving from $250 billion to at least $300 billion. The White House says its most recent offer before that was about $1.6 trillion. The aides were not authorized to publicly discuss private negotiations and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Pelosi’s most recent public offer was about $2.2 trillion, though that included a business tax increase that Republicans won’t go for.

In a letter Saturday to colleagues, Pelosi said, “This proposal amounted to one step forward, two steps back. When the president talks about wanting a bigger relief package, his proposal appears to mean that he wants more money at his discretion to grant or withhold.”

She said that while his administration attempted to address some of the Democratic concerns, disagreement remained on many priorities and Democrats are “awaiting language” on several provisions.

“Despite these unaddressed concerns, I remain hopeful that yesterday’s developments will move us closer to an agreement on a relief package that addresses the health and economic crisis facing America’s families,” Pelosi’s letter said.

Mnuchin’s latest offer also got a roasting from GOP senators, who weighed in on a conference call Saturday morning, according to a Republican familiar with the call who was not authorized to discuss the call publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. Many conservatives are skeptical of so much deficit-financed aid in the first place, and Pelosi-sought provisions such as expanding eligibility for the Affordable Care Act landed with a thud.

Pragmatists such as Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio and politically endangered Republicans including Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina appear willing to “go big” as Trump wants. But rank-and-file Republicans — Sens. Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee, Rick Scott of Florida, and John Barrasso of Wyoming, for example — are adamantly opposed to another relief bill that’s so generous.

GOP Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell remains skeptical of the chances for an agreement, having told an audience in Kentucky on Friday that he didn’t see a deal coming together before Election Day.

“I think

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Democratic poll shows neck-and-neck race brewing in Florida House district

An internal poll shows a tight race brewing in Florida’s 16th Congressional District between Democratic state Rep. Margaret Good and seven-term Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (R).

The internal poll from Good’s campaign, which was obtained exclusively by The Hill, shows Buchanan with a 48-45 advantage over Good among likely voters, a difference that falls within the survey’s margin of error. Another 7 percent remain undecided.

Good has a 47-41 lead among independents, and the two contenders are deadlocked at 47 percent support among seniors.

The result is a marginal improvement from the same poll conducted last month, which showed Buchanan with a 6-point advantage.

Buchanan’s favorability rating is even with 43 percent of voters saying they have a favorable view of him and 43 percent saying they have an unfavorable view. Thirty-nine percent of voters rate Good favorably, while 33 percent view her unfavorably. Twenty-eight percent of voters say they have not heard of her.

Good is also boosted by a strong showing in the poll by Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenFederal judge shoots down Texas proclamation allowing one ballot drop-off location per county Sanders endorses more than 150 down-ballot Democrats Debate commission cancels Oct. 15 Trump-Biden debate MORE, who trails President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal judge shoots down Texas proclamation allowing one ballot drop-off location per county Nine people who attended Trump rally in Minnesota contracted coronavirus Schiff: If Trump wanted more infections ‘would he be doing anything different?’ MORE by 4 points in the district. Trump won the district by 11 points in 2016.

Good first gained prominence after flipping a state House district in 2018, ousting Sarasota real estate agent James Buchanan (R), Vern Buchanan’s son, in a race Democrats said was a sign of burgeoning party strength in the state. 

“In 2018, I won a special election to the state house that no one thought was possible because voters were ready for change and we are feeling that same energy on the ground in Florida this year,” Good told The Hill. “Voters want a representative who actually represents them, not special interests, and is committed to strengthening our economy, solving our water quality issues, and lowering healthcare costs.” 

“Our message is resonating, and we are committed to continuing to make sure it reaches every voter during the last weeks of the campaign.” 

Democrats are hopeful that the Sarasota-area district is in play this cycle after Buchanan’s margin of victory tightened in recent years. He won reelection by 24 points in 2014, 20 points in 2016 and 10 points in 2018. However, Buchanan remains well-known in the district and has the advantage of incumbency.

Florida House races have suddenly been thrust into an under-the-radar, yet important role in the presidential race.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiLoeffler unveils resolution condemning Pelosi for comments on 25th Amendment On The Money: Trump fuels and frustrates COVID-19 relief talks | Trump proposes .8T coronavirus relief package | Vegas ties helped Trump score M windfall in 2016

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Senate Republicans Denounce White House’s Offer for Coronavirus Relief

Senator Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee, a Republican, warned that accepting a bill with Ms. Pelosi’s support would amount to a “death knell” for the party’s ambitions to retain its majority in the Senate and would “deflate” the Republican base, reflecting longstanding concerns among senators eager to protect their credentials as fiscal hawks and stave off primary challengers in the next election cycle.

Senator John Barrasso, Republican of Wyoming, declared that accepting a Democratic push to expand elements of the Affordable Care Act would be “an enormous betrayal” of Republican voters. Republicans have also voiced concerns that the health care provisions Democrats have pressed for could result in the use of federal funds for abortions, a characterization Democrats dispute.

“I don’t get it,” Senator Rick Scott, Republican of Florida, said of the administration’s efforts to reach a sweeping bipartisan deal with House Democrats, echoing the sentiments of multiple senators.

Ms. Pelosi, for her part, informed Democratic lawmakers that she found elements of Mr. Mnuchin’s proposal to be inadequate, writing in a letter on Saturday that “this proposal amounted to one step forward, two steps back.” After scaling down House Democrats’ original $3.4 trillion proposal to $2.2 trillion, she has been unwilling to accept much less than that.

“When the president talks about wanting a bigger relief package, his proposal appears to mean that he wants more money at his discretion to grant or withhold,” Ms. Pelosi wrote, adding “at this point, we still have disagreement on many priorities.” She ticked off a number of unresolved issues, including what she said was insufficient funding for unemployment benefits, child care, and state and local governments, and “reckless” liability protections that Republicans have insisted are a priority.

She said she was waiting for specific language from the administration about several provisions, including a national strategy for testing and tracing to contain the spread of the virus. It remained unclear whether she and Mr. Mnuchin would speak over the weekend.

Moderate Republicans, particularly those who are facing tough re-election races, are among the few senators who have voiced support for a bipartisan coronavirus deal and expressed few reservations about the pice tag. A handful of those senators, on a private call with Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, pushed for action on a bipartisan deal, particularly after Mr. Trump briefly withdrew negotiators from talks and gave Democrats political cover for failure to reach an agreement.

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Trump’s first public address since COVID-19 diagnosis had hallmarks of a campaign event at the White House

President Trump’s first public appearance since he announced his COVID-19 diagnosis appeared to be an unofficial rally at the White House. On Saturday, Mr. Trump addressed hundreds of supporters closely gathered and dressed in Trump campaign gear, repeating unfounded claims of election fraud, attacking Democratic leaders, and falsely claiming that Joe Biden is a socialist. 

White House spokesman Judd Deere said the event was an “official” event, and “the campaign is not involved in this.” Anyone in attendance was invited by the White House, Deere said.

While using the White House for a partisan political event is a violation of the Hatch Act, Deere insisted Saturday’s event had “no Hatch Act implications” because it was run by the White House and not the campaign. 

The Hatch Act does not apply to the president or vice president, but does apply to any other executive branch officials who are involved. The president has been accused of repeatedly ignoring the act, most recently during the Republican National Convention. 

“This is another example I think of the myriad ways in which Donald Trump breaks the rules, and over time, people stop getting agitated about it because he breaks the rules all the time,” Washington Post national correspondent Philip Bump told CBSN’s Lana Zak following the event. “Essentially, he is using taxpayer money to bolster his campaign.” 

The address was made from the balcony overlooking the South Lawn, where Candace Owens’ BLEXIT Foundation was hosting a pro-police rally. Mr. Trump specifically addressed the crowd, telling them their shirts are “beautiful” and that he wants to “put one of them on instead of this white shirt.”

“We have to have law and order,” Mr. Trump said. “I want to thank the BLEXIT Foundation for organizing this event, and especially your two founders, two friends of mine, great people Candace Owens and former Tucson police officer Brandon Tatum. Great job, what a great job. … Thank you very much for being here.” 

Owens tweeted on Saturday that the foundation helped pay for some attendees to travel to Washington, D.C. 

The address was listed on the official White House schedule as “remarks at a peaceful protest for law & order.” 

Virginia Representative Don Beyer, a Democrat, immediately criticized the president for the event, tweeting, “As Trump again uses the White House for a campaign speech, doubtless with the illegal use of taxpayer resources and funds, the Republican National Convention remains under investigation for Hatch Act violations.”

President Trump Delivers Speech To Supporters From White House Balcony
WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 10: Supporters cheer as they wait for U.S. President Donald Trump to address a rally in support of law and order on the South Lawn of the White House on October 10, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump invited over two thousand guests to hear him speak just a week after he was hospitalized for COVID-19.

Samuel Corum / Getty Images


During the event, Mr. Trump continuously remarked on the election, telling attendees that “we got to vote these people into oblivion.” 

“Democrats have run nearly every

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‘We Have Law Enforcement Watching’

At a White House rally on Saturday, President Donald Trump doubled-down on his claims of “crooked” and “fraudulent” ballots found and submitted for the upcoming presidential election, repeating that there are “tremendous problems” with mail-in voting.



a crowd of people standing in front of a building: U.S. President Donald Trump addresses a rally in support of law and order on the South Lawn of the White House on October 10, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump invited over two thousand guests to hear him speak just a week after he was hospitalized for COVID-19.


© Samuel Corum/Getty Images/Getty
U.S. President Donald Trump addresses a rally in support of law and order on the South Lawn of the White House on October 10, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump invited over two thousand guests to hear him speak just a week after he was hospitalized for COVID-19.

“Did you see how many crooked ballots are being found and turned back in and fraudulent? Just what I said,” the president said during his 20-minute speech. “Then they’ll say, ‘He doesn’t believe in freedom.’ I totally believe in freedom…what we’re doing is freedom.”

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He cited the nearly 50,000 voters who received incorrect absentee ballots this week in Franklin County—home to Ohio’s capital and largest city—accounting for almost 21% of the ballots sent out in the county. Franklin County residents reported misprinted information on the ballot, including for a congressional race.

The county’s Board of Elections released a statement on Friday stating that all replacement ballots will be sent out and received within 72 hours and that every voter will be allotted only one ballot while sorting systems will not accept replacement ballots submitted by any individual who voted in-person.

“We want to make it clear that every voter who received an inaccurate ballot will receive a corrected ballot,” the statement reads. “Stringent tracking measures are in place to guarantee that a voter can only cast one vote.”

The Franklin County error was one of several isolated incidents tweeted out by Trump this week to back his claims that mail-in voting is filled with fraud. He also pointed to a New Jersey postal employee accused of dumping 99 ballots—which were placed back in the mail stream for delivery—and a Texas mayoral candidate arrested by the state’s attorney general, Ken Paxton, for forging at least 84 voter registration applications.

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Trump proceeded to falsely state that “every day” there’s a story about fraudulent ballots.

Although cases of voting fraud remain extremely rare, the president has utilized his social media and campaigning platform to hone in on isolated errors in the voting system and amplify false and unfounded claims that mail-in voting will lead to widespread fraud.

“Some thrown out, they happen to have the name Trump,” he said during the rally, referring to a small number of military ballots that were allegedly “discarded” in Pennsylvania last month.

In a statement on September 24, the U.S. attorney for the Middle District of Pennsylvania, David Freed, announced that his office and the FBI were investigating this incident, which occurred in Luzerne County. Freed said that the nine recovered military ballots were found in an outside dumpster, “improperly opened” by the election staff and “discarded.”

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Bess Abell, White House social secretary during Johnson administration, dies at 87

The cause was complications from Alzheimer’s disease, said her husband, Tyler Abell, who served in the final months of Johnson’s presidency as chief of protocol. His appointment carried ambassadorial rank and, along with his wife’s position, placed the Abells among the elite Washington power couples of that era.

Mrs. Abell’s acquaintance with the Johnsons dated at least to the 1950s, when Lyndon B. Johnson (D-Tex.) was serving as Senate majority leader and Mrs. Abell’s father, Sen. Earle C. Clements (D-Ky.), was majority whip. The Johnsons feted Bess and Tyler Abell when they married in 1955, and five years later, the Abells named their second son Lyndon, after the future president.

Mrs. Abell volunteered with the 1960 campaign that thrust Lyndon Johnson to the vice presidency, under President John F. Kennedy, and became personal secretary to Johnson’s wife, Lady Bird Johnson, after their victory. Upon Kennedy’s assassination in 1963, Lyndon was sworn in as president, Lady Bird became first lady, and soon after, Mrs. Abell was named social secretary.

Perhaps the best-known woman to have previously held the role — at the time no man had served as White House social secretary — was Letitia Baldrige, a friend of Jacqueline Kennedy’s who was credited with helping the Kennedys project the aura of elegance that made their White House years known as Camelot.

By at least one account, Mrs. Abell held even greater sway than Baldrige, who had been tasked with “lifting presidential occasions to a continental style and standard,” government scholar MaryAnne Borrelli wrote in the 2011 book “The Politics of the President’s Wife.”

“Lady Bird Johnson placed tremendous confidence in Bess Abell, giving her even more responsibility than had been granted the Kennedy social secretaries,” Borrelli continued. “Comparing the administrations, Chief Usher J.B. West concluded that Bess Abell ‘did for Mrs. Johnson what Mamie Eisenhower and Jacqueline Kennedy had done for themselves. . . . It wasn’t just that Bess assumed more authority than previous social secretaries, she’d been granted that authority by Mrs. Johnson.”

Mrs. Abell set her clock five minutes fast to ensure the timely execution of her job. Her duties required military-level precision and coordination with the head usher, chef, florist and service staff of the White House — not to mention the entourages of visiting dignitaries from around the world. According to a Washington Post report at the time, she “planned, organized and staged the entertaining and feeding of nearly 80,000 presidential guests” — and that was only in her first three years on the job.

For the first couple, perhaps the most personally meaningful events organized by Mrs. Abell were the wedding reception for their younger daughter, Luci Johnson, and her husband, Patrick Nugent, in 1966 and the East Room wedding ceremony the next year uniting Luci’s older sister, Lynda Johnson, and future Virginia governor Charles S. Robb.

The fraught nature of wedding planning — coupled with political exigencies such as a requirement that Luci’s gown be pieced together so that most of the dress

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Senate Republicans rip new White House coronavirus proposal

Senate Republicans on Saturday offered fierce pushback against the administration’s latest coronavirus relief proposal during a call with Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinOn The Money: Trump fuels and frustrates COVID-19 relief talks | Trump proposes .8T coronavirus relief package | Vegas ties helped Trump score M windfall in 2016 Trump fuels and frustrates COVID-19 relief talks SBA simplifies PPP forgiveness for small loans MORE and White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill’s Campaign Report: Trump campaigns on Rush Limbaugh show l Democrats question Trump’s mental fitness l Coronavirus stimulus in doubt before election Debate commission co-chair: ‘No evidence whatsoever’ Trump has tested negative The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Dems ruffle feathers with POTUS fitness bill MORE.

Senate Republicans raised concerns about the $1.8 trillion price tag of the White House’s latest offer to House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiLoeffler unveils resolution condemning Pelosi for comments on 25th Amendment On The Money: Trump fuels and frustrates COVID-19 relief talks | Trump proposes .8T coronavirus relief package | Vegas ties helped Trump score M windfall in 2016 Trump fuels and frustrates COVID-19 relief talks MORE (D-Calif.), multiple sources familiar with the call told The Hill.

One source familiar with the call said that there were “significant concerns raised with the price tag.”

“There’s an openness to continue negotiating, but the current topline is an obstacle,” the source added.

Concerns about the White House’s offer came from across the conference, underscoring the work the White House and Trump face to get any potential deal across the finish line in the GOP-controlled Senate even as the president has publicly urged negotiators to “go big.”

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderThis week: Coronavirus complicates Senate’s Supreme Court fight Poll finds support for independent arbiters resolving ‘surprise’ medical bills Democratic Senate candidate in Tennessee discusses working-class background MORE (R-Tenn.), who chairs the Senate’s Health Committee, told Meadows and Mnuchin that there was “no appetite” within the Senate Republican conference for a $1.8 trillion bill, a second person briefed on the call told The Hill. Sen. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnGOP Sen. Thom Tillis tests positive for coronavirus Netflix distances from author’s comments about Muslim Uyghurs but defends project Hillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns MORE (R-Tenn.) warned that it could be a “death knell” for the party in November and Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) told Meadows and Mnuchin “I don’t get it.”

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGOP Rep. Mike Bost tests positive for COVID-19 Cruz says he raised concerns with Trump over Gorsuch and Kavanaugh before nominations Deadline accidentally publishes story about Pence being diagnosed with COVID-19 MORE (R-Utah), who recently tested positive for the coronavirus, also expressed concern that it would cost the party support in the election and would take the focus off of the caucus’s top priority: confirming Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

In response

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Meet the Winners – The Culture of Living: The Inspired Kitchen Contest

For Gaggenau, The Inspired Kitchen is a contest that pays homage to the heart of the home by inspiring design that assures, entertains, and sparks conversation. Designers were invited to put their creativity and design philosophy to the test by creating a culinary space where luxury is expressed through emotion, materials, craftsmanship, and aesthetics. Each designer submitted 3-to-6 kitchen illustrations, renderings, or drawings, including three Gaggenau appliances, as well as a written narrative describing their design inspiration and appliance selection. And, in the spirit of giving back, for the first 20 entrants, Gaggenau donated $500 per submission to The James Beard Foundation—an organization whose mission is to celebrate, nurture, and honor chefs and other leaders making America’s food culture more delicious, diverse, and sustainable.

The five winning designs were chosen based on creativity, originality, and functionality:

JENNIE BISHOP – Studio Gild

Jennie Bishop and design partners Melissa Benham and Kristen Ekeland define the kitchen by “understated drama, sophisticated custom detailing, and plenty of space in which a young family could entertain and expand.” The look and feel echoes the modern, minimalist design of the house. Anchored by an 18-foot island with seating for six, the space features a book-matched marble slab as a backdrop for a custom brass hood over the cooktop. Gaggenau appliances seamlessly blend into the overall design without distraction for an end result that is light, clean, and functional.

Gaggenau Appliances incorporated:

36” 400 series gas cooktop
30” 400 series double oven
24” 400 series dishwasher
24” stainless steel built-in microwave drawer
30” 400 series warming drawer

DANIELLA VILLAMIL – Daniella Villamil Interiors

Villamil’s kitchen brings the outside in with finishes and detailings that reflect the native landscape, which takes centerstage through glass walls. “Every single detail in the kitchen was thoughtfully planned to connect with an environment and evoke a feeling of luxury, comfort, and connection,” Villamil says. The kitchen hood was finished in a burnished copper to mimic the sunsets; the backsplash was chiseled from rock excavated during construction, the wood for the cabinets was sourced locally, stools were sculpted from tree stumps by a local artist, and the islands were crafted from unfinished wood to contrast with the concrete floors and ceilings.

Gaggenau Appliances incorporated:

36” and 15” 400 series gas cooktops
30” 400 series oven
30” 400 series combi-steam oven
30″ 400 series warming drawer
30” 400 series refrigerator / freezer
24” 400 series dishwasher

Courtesy of Daniella Villamil

STEFANO VENIER – Canova

A study in sculptural simplicity, Venier’s kitchen is designed for the sophisticated gourmand. “The kitchen combines style and performance for the aesthete who entertains, providing elevated culinary experiences assisted by technological innovations,” he says. While functional, the forms of two central elements—the Italian Bronzo Amani marble stone island and the oxidized bronze wall unit—appear as sculptural pieces yet hide state-of-the-art functionality. When electronically raised and recessed, the island reveals a host of appliances as well as a work area with a welded sink, a retractable faucet, and a custom

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