White House now has two CDC epidemiologists helping with contact tracing

President Trump and at least 34 White House staff members and other contacts have tested positive for the virus, according to Wednesday’s senior leadership brief on the covid-19 response prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Some of those people are suspected of having become infected at White House and Republican National Committee events.

The White House by Tuesday completed contact tracing related to the president’s infection and cases involving several other people, a senior White House official said, raising concerns among infectious-disease experts about whether a thorough investigation could be completed so quickly. The official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal matters, said anyone meeting the CDC’s definition of “close contact” with someone who tested positive had been notified and given health recommendations.

It remains unclear when the White House began contact tracing. If the effort did not begin right away, or go far back enough, infections may have been missed, experts said.

If the White House had started immediately, “then early control could have held back numbers of infections and further need for ongoing tracking,” said Jeanne Marrazzo, an infectious-diseases expert at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Several White House staffers and administration officials expressed anger and bewilderment that the White House had not undertaken a more robust contact-tracing effort sooner. They said many people — including White House residence staff who do not have the stature of a lawmaker or a top political aide — had not been contacted despite possible exposures, putting them and others at risk in a still-growing outbreak. The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive matters.

The CDC began offering help last Friday, after President Trump announced he had tested positive, only to be repeatedly spurned, according to a CDC official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal matters. On Wednesday, an arrangement was made for “some limited CDC involvement,” the official said.

White House officials rejected the assertion they have turned down help, pointing to the CDC epidemiologist already detailed to the White House Medical Unit. That epidemiologist is leading the White House investigation and has been in communication with agency officials, according to a senior White House official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.

White House officials said they have completed their investigation of the Rose Garden event celebrating the Supreme Court nomination of Amy Coney Barrett that was attended by nearly 200 people, based on photos.

The White House Medical Unit, with a staff of more than 50, has been in touch with the D.C. Department of Health and mayor’s office to report confirmed cases, the official added.

“Any positive case is taken very seriously, which is why the White House Medical Unit leads a robust contact-tracing program with CDC personnel and guidance to stop ongoing transmission,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said.

White House officials said their investigation is unlikely to find the outbreak’s source.

“There were a number of guests who

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Six RCMP officers injured on the job in Southern Interior in four days



a van parked in front of a car: According to RCMP, six front line officers were hurt on the job in B.C.'s Southern Interior in a span of four days.


© THE CANADIAN PRESS
According to RCMP, six front line officers were hurt on the job in B.C.’s Southern Interior in a span of four days.

Six RCMP officers in B.C.’s Southern Interior region have been injured on the job in a span of 96 hours, according to the RCMP Southeast District.

All of the front-line officers that got hurt were carrying out arrests of volatile individuals at the time, said a news release issued by the RCMP.

“Each of these dangerous situations has not only deeply impacted these extremely dedicated police officers, but has also had lasting implications on their families and colleagues,” said Chief Supt. Brad Haugli, RCMP Southeast District commander.

Read more: ‘I lost my soulmate’: Widow of Calgary officer strives to eliminate workplace fatalities

According to RCMP, the first incident on Oct. 3 in Grand Forks involved emergency paramedics responding to a report of an intoxicated man lying face down outside a home in the 6400-block of 18 Street.

Ambulance paramedics approached the individual, at which time RCMP said he sprung to his feet and suddenly became aggressive.

The paramedics called the Grand Forks RCMP for help.

RCMP said a front-line officer arrived and approached the man who continued to yell aggressively.

The suspect allegedly grabbed onto the officer and forced them to the ground, where he continued to assault the officer.

The suspect fled on foot before the officer could make an arrest.

Read more: Man in hospital after allegedly shooting at Surrey RCMP officer, turning gun on himself

The suspect, a 35-year-old Grand Forks man, was apprehended without further incident by another front-line officer who was responding to the scene to assist.

The police officer sustained non-life-threatening injuries and was medically assessed at the scene by the emergency paramedics who had initially called for support. The officer was later examined in hospital.

On Oct. 7,  Salmon Arm RCMP responded to a report of a disturbance inside a home, where a distraught man was reportedly experiencing a mental health crisis and causing property damage.

RCMP said a pair of uniformed officers responded to the home, and arranged to have emergency medical crews staged nearby.

According to the RCMP, they managed to de-escalate the situation and convinced the man to exit the home to obtain medical attention for the lacerations and abrasions he sustained.

RCMP said that’s when the 41-year-old Sorrento man suddenly lunged at both officers, who required the use of a Conducted Energy Weapon (CEW) to subdue him.

Both responding officers received medical treatment for non-life-threatening injuries following the arrest. One officer sustained a lower arm fracture.

Read more: Huntsville OPP search for suspect after officer injured at R.I.D.E. stop

Also on Oct 7, three officers in Kamloops suffered injuries while working together to apprehend a dangerous offender, who led police on a dangerous pursuit.

One officer sustained injuries as a result of the suspect allegedly side-swiping the officer’s cruiser.

A second officer sustained a lower arm injury after jumping out of the way

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Reboot Test Kitchen Returns with A New Interactive Animated Short

Seattle’s Reboot Test Kitchen is returning this October to workshop an interactive tale that will explore gender identity.

Seattle’s Reboot Test Kitchen is returning this October to workshop an interactive tale that will explore gender identity through the larger than life imagination of a child.

Writer Adam Kern is hopeful that his “_____form Prologue” will develop into an interactive animated short. The medium will be a natural fit as the piece features slice-of-life moments that often erupt into epic clashes of dragons and fantasy. The project is designed to showcase the internal weight and importance that identity can carry for the young protagonist.

The workshop highlights an inclusive and diverse cast of actors, featuring professional voice-over artist Julie Rei who also served as an invaluable consultant on the piece.

‘Trans representation in art is not only a personal mission of mine, but also aligns with the mission of Reboot Theatre Company,” says Jasmine Joshua, founder and Artistic Director of Reboot Theatre Company. “I chose Adam’s script because I wanted to encourage writers of all backgrounds to include trans narratives in their work and, as a trans writer, artist, and producer, I wanted to help him develop it and provide the dramaturgical support needed to make the piece as authentic and uplifting as possible.’

Kern says, “As a cis-gendered gay man, I’ve always realized that my understanding of the complexities these characters are going through are not to the level of those who have actually lived through them. Authentic feedback and assistance have always been one of our major priorities and the Test Kitchen will continue to be a natural extension of that goal.”

Kern, a professional actor who also co-owns and directs for an immersive theatre company in Cleveland, has produced 30-40 readings of other artists work, but states that he’s beyond thrilled to watch his words come to life as a first-time writer himself.

Producer Clint Sears adds that he was immediately on board for the idea the moment Kern pitched it. “Empathy starts with understanding and Adam is crafting something that’s not only entertaining but accessible for everyone. To find the balance in a work that has authentic representation and speaks to cultural awareness as well would be the ultimate success.”

The performance and workshop will be on Monday, October 12th, between 7:00-9:00 PM PT, and will include work from five other artists. More information available at https://www.reboottheatre.org.

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Coronavirus live news: record global case rise; Washington health officials ask Rose Garden guests to get tested | World news













Trump doctor says he anticipates president’s ‘return to public engagements’ on Saturday

Updated





Washington warns those at White House super-spreader event

In an extraordinary step, the Washington, DC, Department of Health has released an open letter appealing to all White House staff and anyone who attended a September 26 event in the Rose Garden and inside the building to mark the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the supreme court to seek medical advice and take a Covid-19 test.

The letter indicates a lack of confidence in the White House medical team’s own contact tracing efforts regarding an ongoing virus outbreak that has infected Donald Trump, multiple senior staff members and two US senators, among others, The Associated Press writes.

Co-signed by nine other local health departments from neighboring jurisdictions in Maryland and Virginia, the letter flatly states a belief that contact tracing on the outbreak has been insufficient.

It says the public appeal is based on, “our preliminary understanding that there has been limited contact tracing performed to date, there may be other staff and residents at risk for exposure to Covid positive individuals.”

It asks all White House employees, anyone who attended the Sept. 26 event and anyone who may have been in contact with those people to “contact your local health department for further guidance/questions regarding your potential need to quarantine.”

The letter represents a rising level of concern and a clear shift in strategy by Mayor Muriel Bowser’s government, which had previously remained publicly hands-off and said it trusted the White House’s robust medical operation to handle its own contact tracing and follow-up.





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Overnight Health Care: Regeneron asks for emergency authorization of coronavirus treatment Trump received | McConnell says he hasn’t visited White House in two months due to coronavirus

Welcome to Thursday’s Overnight Health Care.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Overnight Health Care: Regeneron asks for emergency authorization of coronavirus treatment Trump received | McConnell says he hasn't visited White House in two months due to coronavirus | Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rise 4 percent


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Overnight Health Care: Regeneron asks for emergency authorization of coronavirus treatment Trump received | McConnell says he hasn’t visited White House in two months due to coronavirus | Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rise 4 percent

Regeneron filed for emergency authorization of its antibody COVID-19 treatment drug, just hours after President Trump claimed it basically cured him. Mitch McConnell hasn’t been to the White House in months, and a new analysis shows Americans’ job-based health care is continually getting more expensive.

We’ll start with Regeneron:

Regeneron asks for emergency authorization of coronavirus treatment Trump received

Biotech company Regeneron late Wednesday applied for emergency authorization for an experimental antibody treatment praised by President Trump.

“Subsequent to our discussions with regulatory authorities, we have submitted a request to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for our REGN-COV2 investigational antibody combination for COVID-19,” the company said in a news release.

The move came just hours after the president praised the efficacy of the treatment in a short video message posted on Twitter.

“They gave me Regeneron, it’s called Regeneron,” Trump said in the five-minute video Wednesday afternoon. “It was unbelievable. I felt good immediately. I felt as good three days ago as I do now.”

Why it matters: Trump was taking several drugs for his illness, so it’s not clear which helped him feel better. He claimed he has the “emergency use authorization all set,” but the FDA is supposed to make decisions based on science and not demands from the president. Regeneron’s drug is still undergoing clinical trials, and while early results seem promising, the company has not released data to back up its claims.

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McConnell says he hasn’t visited White House in two months due to coronavirus

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on Thursday that he hasn’t visited the White House in two months because of how it has responded to the coronavirus.

Speaking in Kentucky, McConnell said that while he talks to President Trump frequently, he hasn’t been to the White House in person since Aug. 6.

“Because my impression was their approach to how to handle this was different from mine and what I insisted we do in the Senate, which was to wear a mask and practice social distancing,” he told reporters.

McConnell’s comments come in the week after President Trump and roughly two dozen people in his orbit have tested positive for the coronavirus.

The Senate doesn’t have a mask mandate, though most senators wear masks around the Capitol and there are also signs to remind people to socially distance.

Unlike the Senate, the White House has rapid testing for those in contact with the president. But there have also been several events where the White House did not require social distancing and most people at the event did not wear masks.

McConnell on Thursday appeared to take a veiled jab at the White

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The White House won’t say when Trump has tested negative since May

  • The White House has repeatedly refused to disclose when President Donald Trump last tested negative for COVID-19.
  • The last time Trump or anyone at the White House said the president tested negative on the record was on May 21.
  • It’s unclear how frequently Trump has been tested since, and he has repeatedly violated coronavirus restrictions by holding public events with large crowds.
  • When asked when Trump was last tested and if the White House could specify any results between May 21 and Trump’s positive one on Oct. 2, a White House spokesman said only that “the president is tested regularly.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Despite the seismic implications of the president of the United States contracting a deadly and highly infectious disease with no cure, the White House is still providing very little basic information about Donald Trump’s coronavirus status.

Aside from his positive test announcement last Friday — which led to him being hospitalized with COVID-19 for three nights — the last time Trump was on the record about taking a test was back in May, when he said, “I tested positively toward negative.”

Between Trump’s “positively toward negative” disclosure on May 21 and the tweet confirming he had tested positive for COVID-19 on Oct. 2, the White House would not point Insider toward any specific instances when Trump even took a test.

At one point back in July, White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany claimed Trump was tested “multiple times a day” before he contradicted her later in the day and said he couldn’t recall taking more than one in 24 hours.

McEnany, along with other White House officials such as spokeswoman Alyssa Farah, have declined to specify when Trump takes coronavirus tests or the last time he tested negative.

“I can’t reveal that at this time. Doctors would like to keep it private,” Farah said on Thursday.

The president attended 113 public events between his last known negative test and the night before he disclosed he had COVID-19, according to a database of his travel and events calendar from Factba.se, a site with a variety of Trump-related databases.

Insider asked the White House repeatedly on Thursday how often the president is tested, when his last test was, and if they have disclosed any tests taken since May 21.

“The president is tested regularly,” a White House spokesman said in an email.

When asked how frequently “regularly” means, they did not respond.

Lots of events, few precautions from Trump

Other than the rare occasion when he wears a mask in public, like when he did so for the first time in July, the president has mostly flaunted basic public health precautions. He’s also rarely enforced social-distancing rules and mask-wearing at his rallies and other public events.

Trump’s events have varied in size and density, but there have been a few noteworthy examples that posed more risk than others:

 

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Pelosi, Mnuchin speak about relief bill

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin speaks during a news conference to announce the Trump administration’s restoration of sanctions on Iran, at the U.S. State Department in Washington, September 21, 2020.

Patrick Semansky | Pool | Reuters

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin spoke about a broad coronavirus stimulus plan Thursday, capping another day of jumbled efforts in Washington to inject more aid into a floundering economy. 

Pelosi and Mnuchin had a 40-minute afternoon phone conversation about “whether there is any prospect of an imminent agreement on a comprehensive bill,” the speaker’s spokesman Drew Hammill said in a tweet.

Hammill said Mnuchin “made clear” Trump had interest in finding agreement on a comprehensive relief package — generally considered one that would address a range of issues including jobless benefits, direct payments, state and local government relief, and aid to airlines to cover payrolls. 

Pelosi pointed out comments from White House communications director Alyssa Farah, who on Thursday afternoon cast doubts on Trump’s desire to craft broad legislation. Farah told reporters the White House wants to address stimulus checks, small business loans and an “airline bailout,” but not as “part of a larger package.” 

The speaker would take Mnuchin’s word that Trump wants a broad proposal, Hammill added. 

“The Speaker trusts that the Secretary speaks for the President,” he wrote. 

Later Thursday, Farah told reporters “we’re open to going with something bigger.” But “we’re not going to operate from the $2.2 trillion that the speaker laid out,” she said. 

The developments Thursday afternoon continue a confusing week of back-and-forth between the Trump administration and Pelosi as the sides make a last-ditch push to send more aid to Americans before the 2020 election. Barring a quick resolution, it appears doubtful Congress can pass another relief bill before Nov. 3 even as more signs of a faltering economic recovery emerge.

Early in the week, Pelosi and Mnuchin had conversations about a fifth pandemic aid package that Congress has struggled to craft for months. As the White House and Democrats tried to find common ground between their $1.6 trillion and $2.2 trillion offers, respectively, Trump on Tuesday ordered his administration to call off stimulus talks until after the election.

He quickly reversed course that night. The president pushed for piecemeal bills to send direct payments to Americans and relief to airlines. Trump reiterated his call for stand-alone bills Thursday.

After Pelosi opened the door to a separate bill only to send money to airlines to prevent tens of thousands of furloughs, she shut it on Thursday. She then suggested talks about a comprehensive plan could move forward. 

“We’re at the table. We want to continue the conversation. We’ve made some progress, we’re exchanging language,” the speaker told reporters. 

The frenetic discussions have left even congressional leaders perplexed. 

“I think we’re still talking and trying to see if we can narrow our differences,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Thursday in Kentucky. “And you know, the discussion from day to day can be

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DC faults White House over Rose Garden event, says contact tracing insufficient

By ASHRAF KHALIL

WASHINGTON (AP) — In an extraordinary step, the Washington, D.C., Department of Health has released an open letter appealing to all White House staff and anyone who attended a Sept. 26 event in the Rose Garden to seek medical advice and take a COVID-19 test.

The letter indicates a lack of confidence in the White House medical team’s own contact tracing efforts regarding an ongoing virus outbreak that has infected President Donald Trump, multiple senior staff members and two U.S. senators, among others.

Co-signed by nine other local health departments from neighboring jurisdictions in Maryland and Virginia, the letter flatly states a belief that contact tracing on the outbreak has been insufficient.

It says the public appeal is based on, “our preliminary understanding that there has been limited contact tracing performed to date, there may be other staff and residents at risk for exposure to COVID positive individuals.”

It asks all White House employees, anyone who attended the Sept. 26 event and anyone who may have been in contact with those people to “contact your local health department for further guidance/questions regarding your potential need to quarantine.”

The letter represents a rising level of concern and a clear shift in strategy by Mayor Muriel Bowser’s government, which had previously remained publicly hands-off and said it trusted the White House’s robust medical operation to handle its own contact tracing and follow-up.

Bowser said earlier this week that repeated attempts to contact the White House over the outbreak had received a “very cursory” response but that she believed the necessary steps were being taken.

“There are established public health protocols at the White House that are federal in nature,” Bowser said on Monday. “We assume that those protocols have been engaged.”

A Health Department spokeswoman did not respond to questions on whether the letter had been directly sent to any White House employees or people who attended the Sept. 26 event, or if the D.C. government had been provided with a list of attendees.

The move highlights the public health dilemma faced by Bowser’s government regarding the current outbreak. The Trump White House has operated for months in open violation of several D.C. virus regulations, hosting multiple gatherings that exceeded the local 50-person limit and in which many participants didn’t wear masks.

It shines a further spotlight on the Sept. 26 Rose Garden ceremony to introduce Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett. Multiple attendees, including Trump and Notre Dame University President Rev. John Jenkins, who flew in from Indiana for the ceremony, have now tested positive.

Washington’s local virus regulations don’t apply on federal property, but the current outbreak has blurred those distinctions. Trump inner-circle members like former counselor Kellyanne Conway, who has also tested positive, are D.C. residents, as are many of the staffers, employees, Secret Service members and journalists who have had close contact with infected officials.

White House spokesman Judd Deere said Monday that the White House “has established a robust contact tracing program led

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Both parties prepare for possibility of contested election as chaotic White House race hurtles to a close

She has also directed some of her members to be ready if GOP legislatures in states with narrow margins or unfinished counts seek to appoint their own electors, a situation Democrats hope to head off with an obscure law from the 19th century that allows Congress to intervene.

The internal talks are among a number of strategy sessions taking place in political and legal circles in anticipation of a post-Election Day fight. The campaigns of President Trump and former vice president Joe Biden are preparing for all scenarios, each amassing robust legal teams to prepare for post-Nov. 3 disputes, in addition to monitoring Election Day activity and ballot counting.

An uncharted battle over who the next president will be, after a campaign that has roiled and exhausted Americans, could severely test the nation’s faith in its election system — and undermine the principle that the president should be selected by voters rather than Congress or the courts, experts said.

“These are all terrible scenarios to contemplate,” said Richard H. Pildes, a professor of constitutional law at New York University. “Nothing is more explosive in a democratic system than a disputed election for the chief executive, because so much turns on who holds that office.”

Campaign operatives, election lawyers and constitutional scholars say there are several scenarios that could push the outcome of the White House race to Congress for the fourth time in history — or to the Supreme Court, as happened in the contested 2000 election.

While most agree such possibilities are slim, Trump has heightened concerns — and preparations — by repeatedly refusing to commit to conceding if he loses, while declaring that he wants the courts to play a role in deciding the race.

During the first presidential debate last week, the president repeated his unsubstantiated claims that voting by mail will lead to widespread fraud, adding that he wants the Supreme Court “to look at the ballots.”

“If it’s a fair election, I am 100 percent on board,” Trump said. “But if I see tens of thousands of ballots being manipulated, I can’t go along with that.”

Many legal and voting rights experts who have been studying the arcane rules that would govern a contested election say they are less worried about Trump refusing to concede if he loses decisively than they are about a complicated delay over disputed ballots.

Myrna Pérez, director of the Voting Rights and Elections Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, said she fears that there will be “no limits to the political hardball” and “no things that are off the table when people are trying to translate votes into political victories.”

“I wonder what that’s going to leave us with, if we don’t have any shared-upon norms, when there’s not a basic understanding that winning at all costs is not good for us,” Pérez said during a virtual panel discussion last week.

Biden’s continued strength in national and battleground-state polls has heartened Democrats, who are hopeful that he will win

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Poll shows Biden leading Trump, tight House race in key Nebraska district

A new Democratic poll shows presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenFive takeaways from the vice presidential debate Harris accuses Trump of promoting voter suppression Pence targets Biden over ISIS hostages, brings family of executed aid worker to debate MORE with a hefty lead over President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from the vice presidential debate Harris accuses Trump of promoting voter suppression Pence targets Biden over ISIS hostages, brings family of executed aid worker to debate MORE in Nebraska’s 2nd Congressional District, and Democrat Kara Eastman holding a slim advantage there over Rep. Don Bacon (R). 

A poll conducted for the Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) PAC and obtained exclusively by The Hill shows Biden getting the support of 53 percent of likely voters surveyed, compared with 42 percent for Trump. Another 5 percent are undecided, will vote for another candidate or refused to answer. Biden has a heftier 58 percent to 33 percent advantage among voters who have already cast ballots. 

In the House race, Eastman narrowly leads Bacon by a 47 percent-45 percent margin, while Libertarian candidate Tyler Schaeffer gets 6 percent. Eastman also grows her lead over Bacon among those who have already voted, holding a 59 percent-36 percent edge. 

“Kara Eastman has continued to earn the support of Nebraskans by running a grassroots campaign that puts the needs of working families in her district first,” said CPC PAC co-chairpersons Rep. Mark PocanMark William PocanCongress fiddles while the US burns, floods, and ails Overnight Defense: Nearly 500 former national security officials formally back Biden | 40 groups call on House panel to investigate Pentagon’s use of coronavirus funds 40 groups call on House panel to investigate Pentagon’s use of coronavirus funds MORE (D-Wis.), Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalHouse votes to condemn alleged hysterectomies on migrant women Trump proposes capping refugee admissions at 15,000 in historic low ‘One more serious try’ on COVID-19 relief yields progress but no deal MORE (D-Wash.) and Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinJewish lawmakers targeted by anti-Semitic tweets ahead of election: ADL Lawmakers urge IRS to get stimulus payments to domestic violence survivors OVERNIGHT ENERGY:  House passes sweeping clean energy bill | Pebble Mine CEO resigns over secretly recorded comments about government officials  | Corporations roll out climate goals amid growing pressure to deliver MORE (D-Md.). “She is in a strong position to win this election because voters know that Kara will fight to lower the cost of prescription drugs, make sure that workers have access to paid family leave and paid sick leave, and stand up to corporate special interests in Washington.” 

The district, which encompasses Omaha, is a top presidential and House battleground. The Cornhusker State is just one of two in the nation that splits up its electoral votes based on the presidential candidates’ performances both statewide and in each congressional district. 

In Nebraska, the statewide popular vote winner gets two electoral votes, and each of the state’s three congressional districts grants one electoral vote.

The state as a whole, and

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