Trump’s White House event in focus over Covid spread

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Media captionSenator Mike Lee, who later tested positive for Covid-19, seen hugging other attendees

US President Donald Trump’s tweet on Friday confirming that he and his wife had tested positive for coronavirus shocked the world.

With Mr Trump now in hospital, there are growing questions about how the pair were exposed to the virus.

A crowded Rose Garden event is coming under intense focus – the ceremony on 26 September where Mr Trump formally announced his nomination of the conservative Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court. The World Health Organization says it commonly takes around five to six days for symptoms to start after contracting the virus.

Footage from the scene showed few attendees wearing masks. The seating was not set two metres (six feet) apart, while some bumped fists, shook hands or even hugged one another in greeting.

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Attorney General Bill Barr greets guests including Chris Christie (wearing the pink tie)

Eight people who attended are now confirmed to have the virus – although it is unclear exactly where and when they caught it. Aside from the president and the First Lady:

  • New Jersey ex-Governor Chris Christie announced he had the virus on Saturday
  • Kellyanne Conway, who resigned as Mr Trump’s senior adviser in August, confirmed on Friday she had tested positive
  • Mike Lee, a Republican senator from Utah, confirmed his positive test on Twitter, as did North Carolina senator Thom Tillis
  • The University of Notre Dame confirmed their president, Reverend John Jenkins, also has Covid-19
  • An unnamed journalist who attended the event also has the virus, according to the White House Correspondents’ Association

Mr and Mrs Trump tested positive after the president’s communications director, Hope Hicks, contracted the virus. She did not attend the Rose Garden event.

Guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control recommend six feet of distance between people outside your home, and covering your nose and mouth when others are around you.

Dozens of lawmakers, family members and staff from the White House were at the event. Those who have tested positive were seated in the first few rows of the crowd.

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Those who have tested positive were sat in the first few rows of the packed event

Gatherings of more than 50 people at an event are banned under Washington DC coronavirus regulations, although federal property like the White House is exempt.

The Washington Post reports that authorities have left contact tracing efforts to the Trump administration. An official from Mayor Muriel Bowser’s office told the paper that if all eight people were infected at the event, it would be one of the highest community spread incidents Washington DC has experienced.

City council member Brooke Pinto told the Washington Post it was “disappointing that the White House has flaunted not wearing masks and gathering large crowds”.

“That is not only dangerous messaging for the country, but it is

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White House not releasing number of staff infected by coronavirus, McEnany says

Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Sunday that the White House would not be releasing the names or the exact number of staffers who have become infected with the novel coronavirus – backtracking on a previous comment by another spokeswoman.

McEnany said due to privacy concerns the White House would not release the number of employees who have COVID-19 despite previous assurances by Alyssa Farah – the White House Director of Strategic Communications – that the numbers possibly would come out.

“There are privacy concerns,” McEnany said. “We take seriously safeguarding the information of personnel here in the White House.”

PRESIDENT TRUMP COULD RETURN TO WH ‘AS EARLY AS TOMORROW’ IF CONDITIONS CONTINUE TO IMPROVE, DOCTORS SAY

McEnany would also not comment on whether President Trump – who announced in the early morning hours Friday that he and First Lady Melania Trump had contracted the virus – had received a coronavirus test before last week’s presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio or before a fundraiser at his golf course in Bedminster, New Jersey last Thursday.

“I’m not going to give you a detailed readout with time stamps every time he is tested,” she said. “He is tested regularly and the first positive test he received was after his return from Bedminster.”

On Thursday morning, Trump’s senior counselor Hope Hicks tested positive for the virus.

The results came not long before the president was set to lift off in Marine One for the fundraiser at his golf club.

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Hicks’ diagnosis affirmed that Trump had been in close proximity to someone infected with the virus. That’s when you should quarantine, according to public-health guidelines. But Trump went ahead with the trip. Not only that, but others who had also been around Hicks were not immediately told about her positive test.

The White House worked furiously to swap out staff who had been in close contact with Hicks and replace them with others. Spokesman Judd Deere was swapped in at the last minute, without being told why. White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany did not make the trip. White House officials said they began learning of Hicks’ positive test after Trump boarded Marine One to start his journey to New Jersey.

Fox News’ Erin McEwan and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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“Cook Like a Firefighter” competition raises awareness about kitchen fire safety

Fire departments across Arizona come together to raise money for the Arizona Burn Foundation.

PHOENIX — Firefighters across Arizona are pulling out all the stops for a big cook-off competition called “Cook Like a Firefighter.”

It’s not just about culinary skills, it’s to raise awareness about kitchen fire safety.

“We invited all of the fire departments across the state of Arizona,” said Mik Milem, Chief Operations Officer at the Arizona Burn Foundation, an organization working to help burn survivors and their families and raise awareness about fire safety.

While a lot of their regular community events are on hold due to COVID-19, they decided to improvise.

“We came up with this idea of doing a ‘cook like a firefighter’ competition,” he said.

The competition, a fun and mouth-watering way to get the community involved and educated on kitchen fire safety, shows support for the state firefighters.

Each department put together their favorite station staple recipe to show off and fight for the prize.

More than a dozen fire departments jumped on board and they had a lot of fun filming in the kitchen, cooking up tasty dishes.

“We told them, be fun but also put some fire safety and cooking safety instructions in there… firefighters lived up to that challenge,” said Milem.

Firefighters made everything from simple pancakes to tri-tip sandwiches.

“Energy balls, I think there’s two different kinds of burgers,” he said.

It’s easy to get involved and vote for your favorite recipe too, by donating to the Arizona Burn Foundation.

“All the money goes back to the fire departments by providing them free smoke alarms and free children’s education programing for them to go out into the community with,” he said.

The event is based on learning new recipes while providing necessary safety tips.

“To help prevent injuries from ever taking place,” he said.

To check out the recipes and vote for your favorite, visit the competition website.

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From Baking to Sous Vide, This Smart Steam Oven Is Your New Kitchen BFF

Look, I have to tell you about the baguettes I made a couple of weeks ago.

There I was, watching this gloopy dough rise, working it with floured hands into long thin strands, seeing it swell to fit the pan, then witnessing the real miracle, the puffing and tanning of these pale tubes into camera-ready loaves.

I couldn’t believe I made them. Neither could my French uncle-in-law. And in truth, I only sort of did. Most of the credit goes to the special baguette pan, the recipe—and the oven.

For about a month, I’ve been testing the Anova Precision Oven, an internet-connected countertop electric oven that cooks with steam. In restaurants and home kitchens fancier than mine, these combi ovens can cost thousands. Anova’s 1,800-watt appliance, which plugs into a regular wall socket, costs $600.

The Anova Precision Oven is small enough to fit on a countertop under the cabinets, but big enough to cook a whole chicken.



Photo:

Wilson Rothman/The Wall Street Journal

Yet it managed to show up my powerful gas oven again and again, with crunchy yet chewy baguettes and dinner rolls, crispy yet juicy roasted chicken, a full head of evenly steamed cauliflower, succulent ribs and pork butt cooked overnight, perfect medium-rare beef tenderloin, and more. (Hope you brought a snack while reading this.)

People in other countries might laugh at my revelation: Steam ovens are already popular around the world. But in the U.S., they’re few and far between. Beyond the price, part of the fear, for me, is that I wouldn’t know how to use it. None of my cooking buddies have one. That’s why Anova’s appearance on the scene is welcome. Not only is it a competitively priced hardware option, but it also already has a deep catalog of recipes showing the full range of the product. The oven’s app carries you through every step of every dish, with instructions and animations, while automatically adjusting the oven settings via Wi-Fi as you go.

While it’s not perfect, the Anova Precision Oven delivered the best crash course in steam/combi cooking that I could’ve possibly received. And it made a middling baker like me look like I was ready for the Great British baking tent. Whether you’re also a big food nerd or just a kitchen competent looking to level up the boring dinner routine or improve your baking skills, this oven is a reason to rejoice.

How It All Works

Steam ovens like this have two separate modes: a low-temperature mode that ranges from about 75 degrees Fahrenheit up to 212 degrees (water’s boiling point at sea level), and a higher-temperature mode, which can pump steam into the oven when it’s running at much higher temperatures.

The reservoir on the side of the oven holds enough water to provide weeks, if not months, of steam.



Photo:

Wilson Rothman/The Wall Street Journal

With the first approach, you can use the oven like you would steam vegetables and fish on the stove, just without boiling water

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White House gave New Jersey officials list of 206 people at Trump’s Thursday fundraiser events

The White House provided New Jersey health officials with a list of at least 206 people who attended President Trump’s fundraiser events in Bedminster, N.J., last Thursday, officials said on Sunday.



a man standing in front of a tree: White House gave New Jersey officials list of 206 people at Trump's Thursday fundraiser events


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White House gave New Jersey officials list of 206 people at Trump’s Thursday fundraiser events

The New Jersey Department of Health said in a joint statement with the Somerset County Department of Health that it reached out to all of the individuals who attended the events hours before the president tested positive for COVID-19.

The agencies said they received the list from the White House and the management of the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster.

The state health department made attendees “aware of possible exposure and recommend that they self-monitor for symptoms and quarantine if they were in close contact with the President and his staff.”

County health officials are conducting interviews with staff members at the golf club and analyzing how much contact each had with the president and his staff and “providing public health recommendations accordingly.”

The statement notes that contact tracing is “ongoing,” and the majority of the club’s staff lives within Somerset County. New Jersey officials said they were told the federal government is also conducting contact tracing.

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The state and county health officials recommended attendees who want to get tested wait at least five to seven days after Thursday.

“While the risk is low, a negative test earlier than that time cannot definitively rule out that COVID-19 will not develop,” the joint statement said.

But officials called on those “who are concerned that they were in close contact should quarantine for 14 days.”

A list provided to The Washington Post on Saturday by the Republican National Committee (RNC) included 207 attendees at Trump’s golf club, with about two dozen in a small roundtable inside with the president. Several of the small roundtable members took pictures with Trump.

The RNC distributed an email to attendees saying they should contact their doctors “if you or any of your loved ones

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Bill to expand support for community addiction treatment passes House

A bill that would establish a $25 million fund to support organizations specializing in addiction treatment and support for family members of those suffering from addiction is heading to the Senate after passing the House last week.

The Family Support Services for Addiction Act, introduced by a bipartisan group of lawmakers including Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandMeeting Trump Supreme Court pick a bridge too far for some Democrats Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers prepare for SCOTUS confirmation hearings before election Sunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election MORE (D-N.Y.) and Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoHillicon Valley: Senate panel votes to subpoena Big Tech executives | Amazon says over 19,000 workers tested positive for COVID-19 | Democrats demand DHS release report warning of election interference GOP senators call on Trump to oppose nationalizing 5G Congress must finish work on popular conservation bill before time runs out MORE (R-WV) in the Senate as well as Reps. David TroneDavid John TroneUS Chamber of Commerce set to endorse 23 House freshman Democrats Preventing the opioid epidemic from getting worse requires attacking it at the source Bicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers MORE (D-Md.) and Dan MeuserDaniel (Dan) MeuserMORE (R-Pa.) in the House, passed the lower chamber via voice vote on Thursday.

Under the bill, local and national groups under a wide umbrella of addiction-related services would be allowed to apply for grants under a fund established to provide $25 million in grants over half a decade. Applicable groups include addiction support groups for both those with addictions and their families, education and training organizations, as well as “systems navigation” services which help families find addiction treatment centers.

“Addressing the addiction crisis in our state requires supporting families who are impacted by the crisis every day. Families are often quickly thrown into a world of addiction and substance use disorder that they know little about, without the resources they need to support their loved ones,” Gillibrand said in a news release in February.

“This key step will support people living with substance use disorder and will encourage their recovery,” she added.

Rates of addiction and substance misuse have risen across the U.S. amid the coronavirus outbreak, which has forced millions out of work and deepened economic woes for many Americans. A survey earlier this year by the Addiction Policy Forum found that 20 percent of Americans reported themselves or a family member increasing their use of recreational drugs or alcohol since the pandemic began.

A separate study last year before COVID-19 reached the U.S. found that nearly half of U.S. adults knew a family member with substance abuse issues.

The lawmakers’ bill is supported by a number of national and local groups focused on battling stigmas around addiction treatment, including the Center on Addiction and Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, which operates Drugfree.org.

One supporter of the bill pointed to the expansion of family support services as a key step in battling the

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Kitchen fatigue: Here’s how to beat pandemic weariness and spice up your meals

Chanterelle mushrooms, basil, pasta and fresh parmesan: it’s a great time to turn for some seasonal comfort photo. (Alex Wilkie/Submitted by Andie Bulman)

The early days of this pandemic were terrifying. I spent the first week glued to my screen. I watched every news conference, obsessed over case numbers and signed up for three different streaming services.

Through my social media feeds, I could see that friends and family were doing the same, but gradually things changed.

Fear was replaced with sourdough, banana bread and pitch-perfect flaky pie crust. Anxiety was channelled into impressive kitchen projects. The kitchen became a source of joy.

Well, that has passed.

Most people are back to making the same five dishes on rotation and trying to pass off cleanup duty to their roommates and partners.

We can do better. Here are my tips for fighting kitchen fatigue during a pandemic:

Use an old tool in a new way

Use a tool that’s been gathering dust, or use an everyday tool in a new way. I use my box grater daily for cheese or lemon zest, but I never grate horseradish and I never grate ginger. This week I’m going to make a horseradish mayo and those tiny holes are going to transform the rhizomes of my ginger into a beautiful paste for a cake recipe that I plan to take to the next level. You can use the box grater to make carrot latkes and potato boxtys. There’s so much potential in each kitchen tool.

Turn to comfort foods

A chill in the air is coming, which means we can put a ban on the herb-laced quinoa salads of summers. Now is not the time for heath and wellness, it’s the season of long-simmering stews, homemade apple butter and from-scratch macaroni and cheese. Embrace the foods that bring you warmth.

My personal favourite comfort food is a rich ginger cake. A pulpy mystery novel, a hot cup of tea and a big slice of this cake are my ideal rainy-day fall combination. 

Ginger cake is good at any time of the year, but especially on rainy autumn days with a good book. (Alex Wilkie/Submitted by Andie Bulman)

Get inspired with cookbooks & online resources

Most libraries are now offering pick-up and drop-off services. Spend an hour or two perusing through a collection of cookbooks — but don’t just check a book out! Commit to creating at least two recipes contained within the tome.

I just borrowed Magnuss Neilson’s Nordic Cooking (Phaidon Press, 2015). Admittedly, I’m not going to make his recipe for puffin soup (very frowned upon and illegal here in Newfoundland), but I am going to challenge myself to break out of my rut and recreate two whole recipes.

Play with a newtoyou flavour

If new cookbooks and old equipment can’t bust you out of the depths of kitchen fatigue, try playing with a new flavour. How about bakeapples? A rare yellow berry found in the bogs and barrens

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White House Warns U.S. Rivals Against Seeking Advantage

With President Trump hospitalized for coronavirus, a top White House official warned against any attempt by U.S. rivals to take advantage of a situation that security experts said presents a fertile ground for interference and disinformation.

White House national security adviser Robert O’Brien said Mr. Trump remains in charge and that any attempt by adversaries to seek an edge would be a mistake of “serious magnitude.”

“I think our adversaries know that the United States government is steady at the tiller and that we’re protecting the American people,” he said on CBS’s Face the Nation Sunday.

In an interview with the Journal, Mr. O’Brien, who last week met with a top Russian official in Geneva, said U.S. alerts haven’t been raised and there was no expectation that rivals such as North Korea, Iran, China and Russia were likely to pose a new threat.

“Any attempt by an adversary to take advantage of the fact that the president has been diagnosed with Covid[-19] would be a mistake of serious magnitude,” he said Friday in the interview. “I don’t expect any country to make that mistake.”

Other officials said that there has been no known threat of significance made by adversaries since Mr. Trump became ill. Mr. Trump tested positive for coronavirus on Thursday and was hospitalized Friday at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.

More National Security News

Mr. O’Brien said Sunday that he expects to brief Mr. Trump, joined by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Mark Milley on the national security situation. Defense Secretary Mark Esper is traveling in the Middle East. The briefing, which was to be conducted Sunday by video teleconference with Mr. Trump, is routine and not in response to any particular threat, officials said.

Mr. O’Brien met late last week with a Russian counterpart in Switzerland before returning to the U.S. a day early after Mr. Trump’s diagnosis of Covid-19. In Geneva, Mr. O’Brien met with Nikolai Patrushev, the secretary of the Security Council of the Russian Federation, to discuss bilateral issues ranging from Russian operations in Syria and Afghanistan to nuclear negotiations and the conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia.

Mr. O’Brien said one of the most prominent messages he conveyed was that Russia shouldn’t meddle in the U.S. election next month. He told them that the U.S. was especially concerned about any efforts that would affect the vote on election day.

The Russians agreed, and stated publicly they wouldn’t interfere. Mr. O’Brien said he would take a “trust-but-verify” approach to the Russians’ claims.

U.S. intelligence agencies have assessed that Russia interfered with U.S. elections in 2016 and is attempting to do so again this year, along with hackers associated with China and Iran. Russia, like the other countries, always has denied such interference.

State Department officials didn’t respond to a request for comment on steps the U.S. taken to apprise foreign countries of the status of the U.S. government in light

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The White House doctor didn’t come *close* to telling the truth about the President’s condition

On Saturday, White House physician Sean Conley said this when asked about President Donald Trump’s health and treatment:



a man wearing a suit and tie: Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)


© Jacquelyn Martin/AP
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

“This morning the President is doing very well. … He is not on oxygen right now. He has not needed any today at all.”

Later in the day — like less than an hour after Conley’s statement — came a contradictory statement from a “source familiar with the President’s health” that said “the President’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care.”

Asked about the discrepancy between the two statements on Sunday, Conley said this:

“I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude that the team, the President in his course of illness has had. I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction, and in doing so it came off that we’re trying to hide something.”

What?

Like, WHAT!

Conley is a doctor. Not a press person. Not a campaign consultant. A doctor.

As such, it is not his job — or anything close to his job — to “reflect the upbeat attitude” of the President or anyone else. It’s his job to provide facts. Facts like: has the President needed supplemental oxygen? What is his temperature? What is his prognosis? You know, medical facts.

But, that wasn’t even the worst thing that Conley said. It’s this sentence that really tipped everything over the edge.

I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction, and in doing so it came off that we’re trying to hide something.

It’s hard to fathom what Conley was trying to say here. I’m not a doctor and even I know that the “course of the illness” is not impacted in any way shape or form by what a doctor says about it.

So, what is Conley talking about? My strong sense is that what he meant was that any negative information about Trump’s condition — aka the facts — would make the COVERAGE more negative. Which, again, is not Conley’s concern. Or, well, it shouldn’t be. Because, and I feel like I may have mentioned this before, he is a doctor and not a press secretary.

(White House communications director Alyssa Farah told PBS’ Yamiche Alcindor that Conley was trying to “project confidence” when he misled the public about Trump’s condition on Saturday. Right. Just as bad.)

Then, at the end, Conley gave up the game. He said he regretted that by not providing facts “it came off that we’re trying to hide something.”

No, it didn’t come off that way. That’s what happened. The White House — via its messenger Conley

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Pregnant Emma Roberts Was ‘Very Excited’ for Socially Distanced Garden Baby Shower, Source Says



a girl in a dress: Emma Roberts/Instagram


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Emma Roberts/Instagram

Emma Roberts found a safe way to celebrate her baby on the way “during such wild times.”

On Saturday afternoon, the American Horror Story actress, 29, celebrated the upcoming arrival of her son during a small backyard gathering with close friends and family. Roberts shared glimpses of the flower-filled baby shower on Instagram Sunday, smiling in one sunny image as she sat in a patterned sundress.



a girl in a dress: Emma Roberts and Garrett Hedlund are "both very grateful for all the love," a source tells PEOPLE


© Emma Roberts/Instagram
Emma Roberts and Garrett Hedlund are “both very grateful for all the love,” a source tells PEOPLE

In another snapshot from the occasion, the mom-to-be stood, cradling her growing baby bump as she wore a mask that matched her outfit.

“So grateful to my family and pod for making my pregnancy feel so celebrated during such wild times,” Roberts captioned the post. “I love you guys @cadehudson22 @kakeykake @britelkin and thank you to @toryburch & @ericbuterbaugh for the magical garden 🌸 #toryburchhome.”

An insider tells PEOPLE that the afternoon event, held at a friend’s house, was attended by Kristen Stewart, Camila Morrone and Garrett Hedlund, with whom Roberts is expecting her first child.

“Emma’s baby shower was a garden celebration so everyone could social distance,” the insider says. “Emma wore a dress that showed off her cute baby bump and a matching mask. She was very excited. She received many wrapped gifts for their baby boy.”

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a group of colorful flowers: Emma Roberts/Instagram


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Emma Roberts/Instagram

RELATED: Pregnant Emma Roberts Shows Off Her Growing Bump as She Says ‘Baby Doll Dress Has New Meaning’

A source close to Hedlund adds that the dad-to-be, 36, “can’t wait for his baby boy to arrive.”

“He loves that he has something so incredibly exciting to look forward to,” says the source. “Emma is doing well. She is getting the nursery ready. She enjoyed celebrating with friends at her baby shower. She and Garrett are both very grateful for all the love.”

In the comment section of her post, Roberts’ Scream Queens costar Lea Michele — who welcomed son Ever with husband Zandy Reich in August — wrote, “You are the most beautiful! 💓.”

Ashley Tisdale, who’s also expecting her first child, commented, “Beauty 💕💕”



Emma Roberts/Instagram


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Emma Roberts/Instagram



a plate of food on a table: Emma Roberts/Instagram


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Emma Roberts/Instagram

RELATED GALLERY: Who’s Due Next? Brittany Matthews, Rose Leslie and More Celebs Who Are Expecting

Roberts showed off some of the party’s treats and decorations on her Instagram Story, including green cookies with icing that read “Baby Boy” and other nature-inspired cookies in the shape of mushrooms and with colorful edible flower art baked in.

In late August, Roberts announced that she and Hedlund are expecting their first child together. A source close to Hedlund told PEOPLE at the time that he and Roberts are “very serious” in their relationship, and “beyond excited

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