real homes of famous chefs


We love nothing more than snooping around the homes of the rich and famous, and it doesn’t get much more A-list than these global gastronomic superstars. From Bobby Flay’s glitzy LA chalet to Nigella Lawson’s sexy London townhouse and Mary Berry’s rural retreat, these deliciously moreish houses belong to some of the biggest celebrity cooks around. Click or scroll to read more…



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article

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Pelosi begins mustering Democrats for possible House decision on presidency

Pelosi, in a Sunday letter to House Democrats, urged them to consider whether the House might be pulled into deciding who is president when determining where to focus resources on winning seats in November. This could lead to more concerted efforts by Democrats to win in states such as Montana and Alaska — typically Republican turf but where Democrats have been competitive statewide. In these states, Democratic victories could flip an entire delegation with a single upset House victory.

“The Constitution says that a candidate must receive a majority of the state delegations to win,” Pelosi wrote. “We must achieve that majority of delegations or keep the Republicans from doing so.”

Pelosi has also raised the issue repeatedly in recent weeks with her leadership team. Other senior House Democrats told POLITICO they’d heard about these concerns from colleagues in recent weeks.

“We’re trying to win every seat in America, but there are obviously some places where a congressional district is even more important than just getting the member into the U.S. House of Representatives,” said Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), a constitutional lawyer.

Trump, too, has taken notice of the obscure constitutional resolution to a deadlocked Electoral College, both in public and private.

“And I don’t want to end up in the Supreme Court and I don’t want to go back to Congress either, even though we have an advantage if we go back to Congress — does everyone understand that?” Trump said at a rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday. “I think it’s 26 to 22 or something because it’s counted one vote per state, so we actually have an advantage. Oh, they’re going to be thrilled to hear that.”

In private, Trump has discussed the possibility of the presidential race being thrown into the House as well, raising the issue with GOP lawmakers, according to Republican sources.

Under the Constitution, the winner of the presidential election isn’t officially chosen until Congress certifies the Electoral College vote total on Jan. 6, 2021. That vote comes several days after the newly elected Congress is sworn in, meaning the delegation totals will change to reflect the winners of House races in November.

If neither Biden nor Trump has secured the 270 electoral votes required to win, the newly seated House delegations will then cast votes to determine a winner. States whose delegations reach a tie vote are not counted.

But it’s more than a math equation. If the House is asked to resolve an Electoral College stalemate, the country will be witnessing one of harshest exercises of raw power in history. If Democrats retain control of the House, they could opt against seating potential members whose elections remain contested, even if state officials say otherwise.

An informal whip count has already begun. Democrats hold a one- or two-vote seat edge in seven states that are expected to feature at least one sharply contested House race: Arizona, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada and New Hampshire. Republicans hold a similarly tenuous edge in Florida. The

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Report highlights impacts of changing climate on B.C. Interior forests

Article content continued

Kriese said the board is asking the province to reassess its long-term objectives for reforestation and update those along with the standards it expects timber companies to meet, in light of expected changes due to climate change.

In its conclusions, the forest practices board requests that government respond to the board by Feb. 21, 2021, and if it accepts the recommendations, submit a progress report on the measures it’s taking within 12 months of the report’s publication.

And the big decision may be whether to let the IDF become a major source of timber for forest firms to harvest at all. The IDF zone is one of B.C.’s driest ecosystems that could be pushed into becoming more grassland than forest by changes in rainfall coming with climate change, said University of B.C. forestry expert Sally Aitken.

“And the forest management practices can accelerate that or slow that depending on how they’re done,” said Aitken, a professor and associate dean in UBC’s department of forests and conservation sciences. “That zone is a tricky one to manage.”

The type of timber harvesting that works best in the zone, partial cutting versus clearcutting, that maintains ecological conditions for successful regeneration is a more expensive type of management, Aitken said.

“Therein lies the challenge,” she said. “Is that the right place to be our wood basket for the province?”

Aitken added that the IDF is also a fire-adapted landscape, but forest-fire suppression has let too many fuels build up in the forest understory. Now drought leaves it more vulnerable to fire.

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Welwyn Garden City chairman urges PL clubs to offer help to grassroots football

Welwyn Garden City chairman Ray Fiveash has told Premier League sides to put their financial plights into perspective as the coronavirus pandemic continues to threaten grassroots football.

As professional clubs count the cost of the delay in returning supporters to stadiums after an increase in Covid-19 cases, there have been calls for a rethink to help those whose finances are in turmoil.

But, further down the pyramid, the measures put in place to combat the spread of coronavirus continue to jeopardise the future of non-league and local teams.

The ‘State of Play’ report, commissioned by energy firm Utilita and released on Monday, revealed 10 per-cent of grassroots clubs fear closure in the coming months.

Former England goalkeeper David James visited the home of Welwyn Garden City FC to raise awareness of the effect Covid-19 is having on grassroots football.

One such club is Welwyn Garden City, who play in the Southern League Division One Central from their Herns Way ground.

Welwyn played their first game in over six months on September 12 with a 2-0 win over Saffron Walden – but many of their revenue streams have been cut off by Covid-19 guidelines.

Due to celebrate their centenary next summer, there are now genuine concerns the club will not be around to toast their 100-year existence – something Fiveash believes puts into stark reality the different challenges faces clubs like Welwyn Garden City and their Premier League equivalents.

“They are worried about losing money, we are worried about losing our very club,” he told the PA news agency.

“The issue at grassroots level, when you get to the senior team, it becomes very expensive.

“Covid came along, they locked us all down, that is fine but we depend on things like our bar – that subsidises our sponsorship and without that we go backwards.

“We have to pay water bills, electricity bills all things like that. We have a ground to maintain even when there is no football.

“The figures don’t surprise me one bit. Without a shadow of a doubt the Government have a terrible job to do but we are struggling and falling between the cracks.”

Fiveash feels more should be done to ensure the revenue created at the top of the game is filtering through to help the clubs in peril.

“Most professional clubs are fortunate – they can close their doors and still have a game of football, at least short-term,” he added.

“We are looking for funding from wherever it can come. The Premier League has had too much money and we haven’t had enough, it is dreadful.

“I believe the Premier League should move more money about – players like Jamie Vardy and Stuart Pearce came to football late and they were playing grassroots football – without that we wouldn’t see these late starters – they both went on to play for England.”

Another former England international, 53-cap goalkeeper David James, was born in Welwyn Garden City and would watch his local team

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Global Kitchen Hood Market 2020 Sales Channels, Technology and Production Analysis, Business Growth by 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 27, 2020 (CDN Newswire via Comtex) —
Global Kitchen Hood Market by Product Type, Market, Players and Regions-Forecast to 2025 provides industry analysis, important insights, and a competitive and useful advantage to the pursuers. The report studies the global status of the market along with growth opportunities, main players, and future forecasts. The report focuses on the growth and development of the global Kitchen Hood market by players, regions, type, and application, forecast to 2025. One of the objectives of the report is to offer an in-depth evaluation of each crucial aspect related to the market size, market share, market growth factor, key vendors, revenue, value, volume, top regions, industry trends, product demand, capacity, and cost structure. The report assists to create merger and acquisition opportunities by analyzing the market vendors. The analysts have estimated a share of every segment of the market, giving methodical information about types and applications of the market.

Competitive Landscape:

The market report highlights key players included in the global Kitchen Hood market in order to render a comprehensive view of the competing players existing in the market. Company details, strategies, aptitude, history, cost analysis, and prevalent strategies. The reader can identify the player’s footprints by knowing the company’s total sales, the company’s total price, and its production by the company over the 2020-2025 forecast-period. The competitive landscape of the market has been elaborated by studying a number of factors such as the best manufacturers, prices, and revenues.

DOWNLOAD FREE SAMPLE REPORT:https://marketandresearch.biz/sample-request/118559

NOTE: Our analysts monitoring the situation across the globe explains that the market will generate remunerative prospects for producers post COVID-19 crisis. The report aims to provide an additional illustration of the latest scenario, economic slowdown, and COVID-19 impact on the overall industry.

Leading manufacturers/companies operating at both regional and global levels: BSH Group, Electrolux, Whirlpool, Elica, ROBAM, Fuji Industrial , VATTI, Miele, FOTILE, Midea, Nortek, SACON, FABER, Haier, Macro, DE&E, Panasonic, FAGOR, Tecnowind, Vanward, SAKURA, Sanfer

The most important types of products covered in this report are: Chinese-style, European-style, Lateral Wall Mounted Range Hood,

The most widely used downstream fields of market covered in this report are: Application 1, Application 2, Other,

Regional Level Analysis:

This report sheds light on the sales growth of different regional and country-level markets. For the historical and forecast period 2015 to 2025, it provides detailed and accurate country-wise volume analysis and region-wise market size analysis of the global Kitchen Hood market. The industry existence and maturity analysis will lead to investment feasibility and development scope. The estimated growth rate of all the regions as well as the returns assembled by each region during the forecast period is mentioned in the report. On the basis of geography, the report covers: USA, Europe, Japan, China, India, South East Asia

ACCESS FULL REPORT:https://marketandresearch.biz/report/118559/global-kitchen-hood-market-by-product-type-market-players-and-regions-forecast-to-2025

What Benefits Does This Research Study Provide?

  • Supporting company financial planning
  • Open up new markets
  • To seize powerful market opportunities
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2 brothers are heroes after saving each other, house during grease fire in Pasco County

The Daily Beast

Sole Witness Who Heard Cops Announce Themselves in Breonna Taylor Raid Changed His Story

This week, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron made the bombshell announcement that the cops who fatally shot Breonna Taylor would not be charged with killing her, calling their use of force in the March raid “justified to protect themselves.”In that justification, he said that one witness corroborated the three officers’ insistence that they knocked and identified themselves at Taylor’s Louisville home while executing a search warrant in connection with a narcotics investigation. It contradicted claims from Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenny Walker, and 11 other residents, who said they didn’t hear the cops announce themselves. Instead, Walker thought he was being burglarized and fired a warning shot that triggered a tragic chain of events.But, according to documents and audio obtained by VICE News on Saturday, that sole witness initially told investigators days after the March 13 raid that he didn’t actually hear officers Brett Hankison, Jonathan Mattingly, and Myles Cosgrove announce themselves.The witness—identified by VICE as Aarin Sarpee but by other outlets and public records as Aaron Julue Sarpee—was picking up his daughter from a unit above Taylor’s when the raid took place.It wasn’t until he was interviewed a second time, about two months after the raid by a sergeant in LMPD’s Public Integrity Unit, that Sarpee said he heard police say, “This is the cops.”Sarpee’s flip-flop, the latest twist in a case that has made Taylor an icon in the Black Lives Matter movement, calls into question the strength of Cameron’s case and the grand jury report, which state officials are demanding be made public.“I never had faith in Daniel Cameron to begin with, I knew he was too inexperienced with a job of this caliber. I knew he chose to be at the wrong side of the law,” Tamika Palmer, Taylor’s mother, said in a Friday statement. “My hope was that he knew he had the power to do the right thing, that he had the power to start the healing of this city, that he had the power to help mend over 400 years of oppression. What he helped me realize is that it will always be us against them. That we are never safe.”On Wednesday, a grand jury indicted only Hankison, though only for recklessly firing shots that endangered people in other units. Mattingly and Cosgrove—the cop who fired the shot that killed Taylor—weren’t charged.Cameron’s charging recommendations were at least partly based on Sarpee’s testimony, since the attorney general said Wednesday that investigators had “an independent witness” corroborate the officer’s account.No Cops Charged With Killing Breonna Taylor“My office was not tasked with determining if this was a tragedy, as it was,” Cameron said Wednesday, admitting that it was unlikely more charges would be laid. “My job was to put emotions aside and investigate facts to see if state law was violated.”Wednesday’s charges came more than six months after a “no-knock” warrant was issued for Taylor’s apartment as part of a controversial

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Pelosi expresses hope that deal can be made with White House on COVID-19 relief

The Daily Beast

Sole Witness Who Heard Cops Announce Themselves in Breonna Taylor Raid Changed His Story

This week, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron made the bombshell announcement that the cops who fatally shot Breonna Taylor would not be charged with killing her, calling their use of force in the March raid “justified to protect themselves.”In that justification, he said that one witness corroborated the three officers’ insistence that they knocked and identified themselves at Taylor’s Louisville home while executing a search warrant in connection with a narcotics investigation. It contradicted claims from Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenny Walker, and 11 other residents, who said they didn’t hear the cops announce themselves. Instead, Walker thought he was being burglarized and fired a warning shot that triggered a tragic chain of events.But, according to documents and audio obtained by VICE News on Saturday, that sole witness initially told investigators days after the March 13 raid that he didn’t actually hear officers Brett Hankison, Jonathan Mattingly, and Myles Cosgrove announce themselves.The witness—identified by VICE as Aarin Sarpee but by other outlets and public records as Aaron Julue Sarpee—was picking up his daughter from a unit above Taylor’s when the raid took place.It wasn’t until he was interviewed a second time, about two months after the raid by a sergeant in LMPD’s Public Integrity Unit, that Sarpee said he heard police say, “This is the cops.”Sarpee’s flip-flop, the latest twist in a case that has made Taylor an icon in the Black Lives Matter movement, calls into question the strength of Cameron’s case and the grand jury report, which state officials are demanding be made public.“I never had faith in Daniel Cameron to begin with, I knew he was too inexperienced with a job of this caliber. I knew he chose to be at the wrong side of the law,” Tamika Palmer, Taylor’s mother, said in a Friday statement. “My hope was that he knew he had the power to do the right thing, that he had the power to start the healing of this city, that he had the power to help mend over 400 years of oppression. What he helped me realize is that it will always be us against them. That we are never safe.”On Wednesday, a grand jury indicted only Hankison, though only for recklessly firing shots that endangered people in other units. Mattingly and Cosgrove—the cop who fired the shot that killed Taylor—weren’t charged.Cameron’s charging recommendations were at least partly based on Sarpee’s testimony, since the attorney general said Wednesday that investigators had “an independent witness” corroborate the officer’s account.No Cops Charged With Killing Breonna Taylor“My office was not tasked with determining if this was a tragedy, as it was,” Cameron said Wednesday, admitting that it was unlikely more charges would be laid. “My job was to put emotions aside and investigate facts to see if state law was violated.”Wednesday’s charges came more than six months after a “no-knock” warrant was issued for Taylor’s apartment as part of a controversial

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Homespun BLM products including cookie kits, garden gnomes raise concerns of exploiting movement

A few weeks after nationwide protests erupted over the police killing of George Floyd, Julie Muller looked for something positive she could contribute to the movement from her Houston home.

The 67-year-old white woman, who has been selling homemade cookie-decorating kits online since March, decided to offer one with a Black Lives Matter theme. The kit comes with cookie cutters imprinted with former President Barack Obama’s face, sprinkles and icing in red, black and green — the colors of the Pan-African or Black Liberation flag.

Other examples of homespun BLM merchandise include wine stoppers and even garden gnomes — objects more often associated with white suburbia. The white sellers insist they are not trying to make light of racial issues or widen their profit margins. But to many onlookers, the sales through the crafts marketplace Etsy may straddle an uncomfortable line between supporting the movement and exploiting it.

Muller’s three children were the first to warn her she might appear to be capitalizing on racial unrest. But that’s partly why she wanted to act.

Julie Muller, who sells cookie decorating kits on Etsy, poses in her kitchen Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, in Houston.  (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Julie Muller, who sells cookie decorating kits on Etsy, poses in her kitchen Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

“I’ve been thinking about what’s systemic racism and what is racial profiling,” Muller said. “It’s more about doing my part. What can I offer?”

The protest movement ignited by Floyd’s death in May under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer compelled businesses large and small to declare publicly that they were “woke” to the pain of Black people. Manufacturers soon began making BLM T-shirts, face masks and signs.

It’s not surprising that independent merchants wanted to express solidarity too, said Patti Williams, an associate professor of marketing at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

To demonstrate sincerity, sellers should commit to making these items permanently to show their efforts are not just an attempt “to jump on a fad,” she added.

There’s also potential for the items themselves to be seen as offensive or tone-deaf.

Sugar cookies with the likeness of President Obama are displayed as part of Julie Muller's cookie decorating kits which she sell on Etsy, on Sept. 22, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Sugar cookies with the likeness of President Obama are displayed as part of Julie Muller’s cookie decorating kits which she sell on Etsy, on Sept. 22, 2020, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Ashleigh Boutelle, 45, of Twin Peaks, California, custom paints garden gnomes as a side business. After making gay pride gnomes, he decided in July to try painting a Black Lives Matter gnome. The yellow-and-black-clad gnome — a nod to the colors used on a Black Lives Matter website — wears a “BLM” hat. He also painted it with a darker skin tone.

“I was just trying to be very careful and present something that you might say is neutral,” Boutelle said. “Hopefully, someone who sees it is not offended.”

He has since gotten a few orders for either Black Lives Matter gnomes or African American gnomes. Boutelle hopes people don’t question his sincerity because his support is displayed on a mythical figure with a pointy hat.

“I like the idea of offering it to

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Coronavirus Live Updates: World Approaches One Million Deaths

“We have been warning for several weeks now that we have not defeated the epidemic,” France’s health minister, Olivier Véran, told French media on Sunday. “The virus has not disappeared. The epidemic has picked up again.”

The number of Covid-19 deaths has risen by 83 percent over the last 14 days, according to a New York Times database. Still, the death rate — averaging about 50 deaths per day in the last week — is far lower than it was in the spring, when the figure averaged more than 1,000 per day. Nonetheless, dozens of cities and regions across the country are preparing to enforce new restrictions on Monday, in an attempt to stem the rising tide of infections.

French authorities have placed a number of French cities, including Paris, Lyon and Bordeaux, on a “reinforced alert” level, which, starting on Monday, will restrict public gatherings to no more than 10 people. Bars will have to close early and enclosed sport establishments must shut down completely.

Meanwhile, hospitals are again under strain, with some 600 new Covid-19 hospitalizations each day since mid-September. Covid-19 patients now represent at least 10 percent of patients in intensive care across the country.

In recent months, France has ramped up its testing policy, with more than one million tests conducted per week, or about five times more than in April. But French laboratories lack the capacity to keep up with the number of tests carried out, resulting in a backlog of tests that have hampered France’s strategy for preventing a second outbreak.

On Saturday, two Nobel Prize-winning economists suggested in Le Monde newspaper that France impose a national lockdown for most of December in order to allow families to gather safely for the end-of-year holidays and “save Christmas.”

Mr. Véran reacted by saying that a lockdown was not part of the government’s plans so far: “We do not rule out any option, but we do not plan for the lockdown option, we act to prevent it.”

Source Article

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Spice Kitchen’s chef Abudu hosts fundraiser Yemeni children

Abudu from Kafe Mamai was joined by Spice Kitchen from the International Rescue Committee (IRC) in Salt Lake City to raise money for Yemen.

Abudu works to prepare food that reflects his African-Caribbean cuisine, including cinnamon-dusted plantains and bhajia.

Photo: Ali Myers/IRC

Meals center on our culture, our ideas of home and family, they open up the community to a broader table. Sitting down to eat together can be powerful. Of all the questions that come up when opening a food business, though, Abudu of Kafé Mamai acknowledges that ’why’ is the most complex. For Abudu this may be especially true. While he loves to share his “culture and experience,” he is also passionate about using his small business to support others in his local community and around the globe. In August, Abudu worked to organize a fundraiser in support of Yemeni children. 

Abudu, like several others who are aware of the Yemeni crisis, has felt called to action. Yemen lies at the center of concurrent crises. While war threatens the lives of citizens, cholera and the coronavirus remain critical concerns as well. Two-thirds of the population are at risk of starvation. The risk of famine and hunger in particular spurred Abudu to begin raising money for Yemeni children to support efforts to increase access to food. 

“I come from a culture where it doesn’t matter where you’re from,” Abudu shares. “You always show hospitality. Even if you’re not eating, if someone comes here as a guest, you feed them.” In this case, Abudu is feeding people locally in order to feed families halfway across the globe. 

Abudu originally lived in Lamu, an island off the coast of Kenya, significant in Swahili culture and history and noted for its distinct architecture. He has lived in the states since 2001 and moved to Utah in 2016, where he quickly joined the Spice Kitchen Incubator program. He officially launched his food truck in 2019.

Abudu from Kafe Mamai was joined by Spice Kitchen from the International Rescue Committee (IRC) in Salt Lake City to raise money for Yemen.
Abudu organized the fundraiser for Yemen, calling upon food trucks across the city to support his cause. Photo: Ali Myers/IRC

“I like that his cuisine highlights his experience and travels,” Kate Idzorek, the Spice Kitchen Incubator program manager, says of the Afro-Caribbean influenced business. Abudu works to constantly improve Kafé Mamai, but he also dedicates time to the well-being of other entrepreneurs by checking in on them. “He’s a shining star,” Kate says. “He advocates for himself and others.” 

When Abudu first pitched the fundraiser last year, he started it as part of Spice To-Go, a hot meal pick-up service facilitated by Spice Kitchen Incubator. The staff at Spice Kitchen were eager to support his idea. This year, he wanted to do more: “Because [coronavirus] has taken over everything else, we don’t talk about things like Yemen,” he says. “It’s not that these things don’t happen [in the U.S.], too,” he explains, talking about hardship experienced in the U.S., like homelessness and hunger. “But it’s different. Worst comes to worst, we have resources.” 

All of the profits that Abudu earned during the fundraiser went towards the humanitarian crisis in Yemen. To further the reach of the fundraiser, he organized other food truck

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