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Jimmy Carter is fully aware his son smoked with Willie Nelson on the White House roof


The top of many a Texan’s bucket list: Sharing a smoke with country icon (and profound marijuana fan) Willie Nelson.

Make it happen on the White House roof, and that’s the stuff of legend.

Former president Jimmy Carter talks about the time one of his sons had that exact experience in the new documentary about his presidency, “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President.”

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According to the Los Angeles Time, Carter says in the film that Nelson “says that his companion that shared the pot with him was one of the servants at the White House. That is not exactly true. It actually was one of my sons.”

The documentary explores President Carter’s love of music and his friendship with several musicians during his term.



Country singers Willie Nelson and Charley Pride present a gold record to President Jimmy Carter at the Oval Office. (Photo by Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images) Photo: Wally McNamee/Corbis Via Getty Images


Photo: Wally McNamee/Corbis Via Getty Images


Country singers Willie Nelson and Charley Pride present a gold record to President Jimmy Carter at the Oval Office. (Photo by Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)


This isn’t the first time it’s been confirmed that James “Chip” Earl Carter III and Nelson shared “a big fat Austin torpedo” during Nelson’s visit to the White House in 1980. In a 2015 interview with GQ, when asked if it was Chip Carter that Nelson shared that legendary joint with, Nelson says; “Looked a lot like. Could have been, yeah.”




“Well, he told me not to ever tell anybody,” Chip Carter said in the same article.

Thankfully, President Carter doesn’t seem too upset about it, and Chip Carter remembers the episode well. During a break in Nelson’s performance, Chip Carter asked Nelson if he wanted to come upstairs.

“We just kept going up till we got to the roof, where we leaned against the flagpole at the top of the place and lit one up,” Chip Carter told the Los Angeles Times. “If you know Washington, the White House is the hub of the spokes — the way it was designed. Most of the avenues run into the White House. You could sit up and could see all the traffic coming right at you. It’s a nice place up there.”

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